Is there such thing as privacy in 2019?

As adults, we make conscious decisions every day to be recorded, wherever we go. And as adults, we are able to make these informed decisions, no matter how much they make us cringe, because we are aware of the ramifications of our choices.

If we didn’t want to be recorded, we simply don’t have to go to that place. Of course that would mean that you likely wouldn’t go anywhere anymore. Nevertheless, I digress.

Where does that leave children?

I ask because I believe that it should be a parent’s choice whether or not they choose to share pictures of their children online. And I don’t believe that anyone should post a picture of someone under the age of eighteen without expressed written or verbal consent from that child’s parent.

A friend of mine works a relatively public job. He’s no Justin Bieber or anything, but let’s just say that he’s ‘google-able’. Because of the nature of his job, he’s aware that he’s in the public eye and that it could be harder for his kids to lead a normal life. He and his wife have a policy that they’re not going to share photos or videos of their children online. They want their kids to be able to make the decision if they want to lead public lives when they’re old enough to do so.

My friend has been to the school, to the baseball association, to the gymnastics studio, and so on and so forth to inform all of these places that he and his wife don’t want photos of their children appearing online. He does this to make sure that the places they’re taking their children are either: okay with this, or if they’re not okay with this they are informed so they can pick an alternative option for their kids.

Last week as my friend was dropping his son off for his first day of Kindergarten, two mom’s took pictures of him and his son in front of the classroom and posted them on facebook.

These weren’t innocent ‘caught in the background’ style photos. These women went out of their way to take photos of my friend and his son to post them to Facebook and brag about who’s child is in their child’s class.

My friend, simply trying to give his kids as normal of lives as he possibly can, was hit with snide remarks and a swift ‘not a chance in hell’ from the mom’s when he asked them to please remove the photos from their Facebook pages. One of the mom’s went so far as to say that if he doesn’t want photos taken of his children then he ought to home-school them.

As I mentioned earlier, I think that the only person who has a right to post a child’s photo is that child’s mother. Clearly, though, not everyone thinks the same way that I do. I can’t lie, I’m having a hard time seeing the other side of this argument. When he told me the responses he got from the women after asking to have the photos removed, I honestly couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

Does privacy is exist in 2019? Do we forgo any privacy we might have, even for children, if we leave our houses? I don’t have kids, so I’m not seeing this from a parent’s perspective, but to me it’s a little creepy to purposefully take a photo of someone else and their child to post to Facebook and brag to your friends.

I don’t think that my friend was out of line in requesting the photo be taken down. But I’m curious where other’s opinions lie with respect to the subject.

*Please Note – I am all for parents sharing pictures of their children. If you want to share pictures of your own children – go for it! I love pictures and videos of cute kids. It brightens my day. I just don’t think anyone should have their decision to not post pictures taken away from them. Each parents decision should be respected.

78 thoughts on “Is there such thing as privacy in 2019?

  1. I agree with you completely! There are so many risks in sharing pics of kids online!!! I think it was you, wasn’t it, Vee. who wrote about the parents choice to share kids photos later impacting them in life with all social media being forever and available publicly. I can come up with at least 4 reasons off the top of my head that it’s sooo not ok to take and post pics of someone else’s kids without asking.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think it’s a parent’s choice whether or not they want to show pictures of their own kids. And that applies to their own kids only, not the children of anyone else.

      I do believe that if a parent shows photos/videos, etc.. of their child it could impact their child later in life. If a parent does so in a tasteful way, then it might not be much of an impact as rather an ‘oh I’ve seen you on facebook!’ and a laugh with a handshake. But some parents do take it too far.

      There was a story making rounds the past few weeks about a famous ‘Youtube Family’ forcing their toddlers to have cold-showers as punishment and them threatening to sue anyone who called them out on that because it’s legitimate abuse of a child. It’s like… your youtube channel has millions of followers – those kids are never going to have normal lives… ever.

      You know, we grew up in a time when there was no social media, so we really have no examples of history to use here. We can’t say ‘oh this happened’ or say ‘it all worked out okay in the end of the kids’ because we don’t know whether it will or it won’t. I think that we should be cognizant of that.

      All of my brother’s are. They choose to not share photos online. My brother gave me permission to post two photos of his daughter. Other than that, these kids are going to be anonymous(so to speak) until they’re 18 and decide what they want to do. And I respect that. I think that’s something that this mom really didn’t think about when she said ‘Not a chance in hell’.

      I guess I wish I could hear her side. I don’t really think she has a valid argument. But if she does, I’d love to hear why she thinks it’s okay to post pictures of other people’s children…

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Privacy is something that is practically non-existent these days. I feel like some platforms are worse than others. FB is extremely transparent and full of gossip, which certainly doesn’t help the cause. I occasionally will post a photo of my toddler but I try not to brag about her all the time. My blog isn’t about parenting anyways, and I prefer to keep it this way. Then there are moms who overshare photos of their kids online and don’t second guess the potential consequences of doing so. They don’t seem to have a problem with it, but perhaps if they were famous like your friend, they wouldn’t like being judged by a mass audience on social media.

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    1. It’s scary to hear, but it’s true what you say when you say that privacy is practically non-existent these days.

      I don’t think any parent is wrong in the decision they make when it comes to sharing photos of their own child. That’s a conversation they can have with their own kid when they turn 18. Ya know what I mean?

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      1. I still feel like minors don’t really have a say in this and that they should have say before the age of 18 imo. How will the child feel when their half-naked photos of them in the bathtub when they were 2 are plastered all over the Internet? It ultimately comes down to the parents and their decisions as to whether or not they feel it’s safe openly sharing photos of their kids online. Even if an IG or FB account is private for example, you still don’t really know who’s snooping around and looking at your stuff. There’s a lot of creeps out there. My advice? Proceed at your own risk. ✋

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      2. Proceed at your own risk is a good outlook for it. I think that because there’s no proof as to the potential harms or benefit people should act with a lot more caution!!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I believe. if asked to remove a pic on any social platform should be pulled out of utter respect….regardless of age or privacy reasons. Now the twisted social concept is too much for me ….hahah…. ruffle the feathers to feed the goose?!?! I’m a bit cynical right now…please, I offer no offense. 🙂 Should be removed w/no question. I also agree w/the concept of distancing your children from tech & still enjoy their social community…shouldn’t even speak “well, home school them”….are they corn fed?? (Smirk) Oh my…maybe you might want to have the water tested (snicker) sorry you are needing to deal w/that short mindedness….Much luck!

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    1. I can’t imagine being a parent and needing to deal with things like this. And I agree with you, privacy reasons aside, someone asking you to take it down, you should do it out of respect. I just don’t understand why you wouldn’t…

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  4. I agree that it is up to the parent if they want to post pictures of their child or not. The lady in this story was completely out of line. I do foresee this issue of privacy becoming a bigger deal. Not saying that your friend would do this, but people have been sued for posting pictures of others.

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    1. He’s actually having his lawyer reach out. I didn’t want to include that in the post though because I didn’t want it to be like ‘Oh he went straight to his lawyer’.

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  5. The school mothers reactions to his request are beyond ridiculous. You’d figure a normal human would realize they made a mistake and retract their postings, assuming he asked nicely and they had no reason to do something spite him. You probably won’t disclose this but you’ve sparked my curiosity, who is this person?😂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. When we were talking, I got the impression he thinks she doesn’t believe she’s done anything wrong and it’s her full right to take photos of anyone she wants and that he’s got an ego for asking her to take it down.

      As for who he is, in the words of Gossip Girl, ‘that’s one secret I’ll never tell’.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I respect your friend’s decision. It’s his kid a not the public’s. My cousin’s boyfriend is like that with his daughter. I respect that. More so for his daughter because he is the type of person who makes enemies (he’s a crooked businessman) and you never know what his enemies may do.

    You also don’t know what others will do with a child’s photo. I’ve heard plenty of creepy stories.

    I as a mother (although my daughter is 31 now😢) there was no internet when she was small, people respected what a parent did or didn’t want when it came to their kids.

    Now people do whatever they want and feel a parent has no right to complain. Gtfoh…. since they feel that they are entitled to di what they want, they should want to contribute towards taking care of the child. Ijs

    Liked by 3 people

    1. It’s true. You really don’t know what happens to a photo when it goes online.

      And you’re right, it was way different before social media. I, at 30, grew up in your daughter’s era. Therefore there was/are no photos of me floating around from when I was a kid. I think my generation had an advantage in that.

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  7. I remembered when HBO featured me and some drawings I did. My social media lit up. So. My kid’s also, lit up. lol. It was, weird. We all, had like 6,000 friends instantly. They thought it was weird at first that all their friends thought I was cool. Then, they became cool at their school. Then, attention shifted and we became normal again with like four friends. I don’t know. Facebook, has a limited bureaucracy for change and no one has an “internet bill of rights.” You see it all over the world, regular people amassing themselves then prestigious or powerful people snuffing it out. It’s that power your powerful friend wants? To control the actions of us, normals?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That must’ve been an interesting experience to have HBO feature you and your work.

      I wouldn’t consider my friend a powerful person. I would just consider him a publicly known person. I think he’d likely say the same thing if asked. That being said, I think when it comes to his kids, he definitely wants to control what happens. He’s going to do what he believes is protecting his kids, so if someone is going to share their identities without his knowledge he’s going to have an issue.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I didn’t entirely agree with the narrative it produced. I did like, how they spliced the original reason we were there using my own responses in an interview. The affect of insta-stardom also deferred any consideration of the facts that produced the art. That’s a problem. Maybe Kylie Jenner really does care about the Monarch Butterfly but, we’ll only see and promote the promoter not the cause. Art is not sustainable without, media. Unfortunately, we have come to see that media can sustain itself without Art.

        Now. This is the nitty gritty. Has anyone in either of our countries voted for a state and federal surveillance system? Yet, here we are every intersection is now miked and angled. Does, his kids wear hoods at birthday parties? Or. About town?

        He makes money selling himself as something, unattainable. He’s angered by the exclusion of his children not having the stand offish posture that maybe some have with him. I’ve been to LA here dozens of times. I like to mess with famous people. Make them, really sell why I should be asking them for a selfie. Then, walk away. I’m like, they saw something in me when I walked passed they should be asking me.

        That’s the biggest problem with private versus public versus democracy versus capitalism.

        I think we’re getting confused. Facebook, is not a government owned company like the water. You don’t have the same rights you would if someone stole your water. They, promote you to sell your data elsewhere. Your essence. Has value to the data miners of the other side of your industry.

        You surely, don’t wish to have your cake and eat it too? If we did. Facebook. Instagram. Would look like to filesharing networks it took the place of. Where do you think the “@user” came from? A long time ago we low social hierarchy types hunkered down and wandered through lines of code not scrolling through crappy memes. You could call your buddy a lot cheaper over several connected networks to reach oh, China. If I started the call from a payphone down the street calling another across town. How you’d find him, was the at symbol and his IP. It, was freer back then and only until a decade later that your ilk monetized it and are now mad that some are using your friend as “social currency.” Shake my head, the pot is calling the kettle black.

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    2. P.S. I do agree you’re right that attention does shift on facebook quite often and people have short attention spans in general.

      I think when it comes to him, he’s fine when someone posts him online because he chose his career and he chose a public life. I think he’s just trying to protect his children.

      (Writing this because I think my last comment didn’t convey that I appreciated your perspective, because I did. It’s all in how you look at it, I guess)

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  8. Whenever there is uploading, there will be downloading. Once information is uploaded, it’s very difficult to trace how content is being used. We can always try to protect ourselves with Data Protection Act, but it’s hard to trace what transaction goes behind our data.

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  9. I agree with your friend.
    I consider myself fortunate that most of my development years were before the prevalence of social media. I cannot imagine what it is like for younger people in this era. There is no escape from the digital noise and invasion of privacy; it is virtually impossible to turn “off” from the outside world.

    I personally feel that even parents should think twice before sharing any image of their child online. For obvious reasons, and also: the young child doesn’t have any “authority” to decide if he/she wants their photo shared with the world or not. From my observations, many times, it is about the adult (parent)’s ego and even about the child…

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      1. Yes, I consider myself very fortunate to have become an adult before the digital era. Personal privacy is very important to me, and it is getting harder to protect it each year.

        I am always baffled when some international tourists visit my country, and randomly snap photos of young children because they appear “cute.” It is a violation of privacy and very rude. How would they feel if a foreign tourist did the same in their own country? Regardless of age, too many folks seem to have lost the ability to empathize or even think of the other person.

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      2. If I saw tourists here taking photos of young children because they thought they were cute, I’d probably butt in and tell them to put their cameras away. But then again, I get baffled when people take pictures of strangers – kids or not.

        A lot of people around here will take photos of grown adults to make fun of their outfits or appearance or mannerisms online. That, in itself, is a whole nother can of worms I don’t agree with.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I politely intervene when I can, informing about the strict privacy laws in my country. That being said it “should” be “common sense” – however, common sense is no longer common…

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  10. I 100% agree with you!
    In my group of mom friends we would NEVER post a pic of another child on our social media unless we had the OK from her first. I generally ask adults too if they are comfortable with me posting any pics online of them because I think that is just polite.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m glad to hear perspective, G. As someone with young kids, you’d probably get weirded out if strangers were taking pictures of you and your kids and posting them to facebook, right? I just think that we have to be careful about who we’re taking photos of and what we’re putting online.

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  11. Facebook made people become very stupid. Everybody seems to think that we should be out there, even from birth.

    I’m not google-able by any measure but both my very minor granddaughters just escaped being kidnapped.

    DO NOT POST PICS ONLINE, EVEN IF YOU ARE THE MOTHER.

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  12. It’s absolutely imperative parental permission should be mandatory for use of their child’s image. Further, it is grossly improper to even take photo’s of someone else’s children without specific permission from the parent(s). As part of my photography, I spend considerable time on the streets doing people/life shots. Under no circumstances will I photograph someone’s child.

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  13. I have wondered the same. At the same time, just because a person is the parent of a child doesn’t mean they should be free make every decision. There are lots of reasons why even parents should think twice about plastering the faces of their children and disclosing locations, activities etc online. You just never know who is getting access. People don’t even have to be on your Friend list to see, and save, your information. If you and I are “friends” on Facebook, and you “like” or comment on a photo your friend — whom I have not added on Facebook and vice versa — I will see that whole thing on my notification page. I will also be able to access the photo and with a right click, save it. Even if the privacy status is set to “Friends Only”. It wouldn’t matter if that friend of you and I are NOT friends. The only thing I wouldn’t be able to do is join in on the conversation and write a comment under his/her photo. The same goes for your friend and my photos. This is the reality. Some of my friends have children and sometimes, it bothers me. The rate they expose their little kids is sometimes too much. They post EVERYTHING their kids are up to. Birthdays, playing in the park, shopping, going to school, wearing new clothes, getting a hair cut and WHERE. They don’t even think twice. Sure, it’s your child but does the child not deserve privacy and should they not have a say about whether they want you to post their business to your friends? They may be small today, but what if when they’re older and see/know about your activities regarding their face and personal activities? There are even parnrs who open Facebook profiles OF their babies (yes, babies) and post photos and other things. A lot of parents also have total disregard for their children’s privacy, simply because they are parents.

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    1. I definitely agree. You don’t know what’s happening with images once the get online and there definitely are a lot of reasons to double-think what’s going online. Just because something is set to private doesn’t mean it’s actually private.

      I also wholheartedly agree that a lot of parents have disregard for their children’s privacy when they post photos. I’ve seen some pretty insane things posted that will really hurt those kids later in life if an employer ever searches their name.

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      1. I am glad to see that I am not alone in this. But of course, you just cannot put some sense into some people. It’s like, just because you don’t have a child yourself, you can’t talk about or care about certain issues and somehow having a child automatically makes a person expert in certain departments.

        Have you also noticed that at times, people seem to try very hard, and it is almost apparant that that day out or whatever they posted about happened simply because the parent(s) wanted to post their children online and show what a fun and happy family time they had? It’s sad. They most would have enjoyed more if instead of taking 30+ photos of the kid(s), they actually hung out and truly spent the time together! Couples tend to do it, too. I don’t know what kind of nonsensical “peer pressure” situation people have created for themselves and others on social media!

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      2. YES! I’ve completely noticed that. I’m like… you people are missing out on these moments with your kids because you’re so focused on wanting to take photos to share. I get that people have a natural inclination to share, but turning a trip to the park into an hour long photoshoot, it’s crazy to me!

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  14. I believe your friend is right.

    People are often rude in public. In Denmark we have problems with people creating chaos at road accidents, because people want to look and often take pictures too.

    It is not OK.

    Not everything in this world needs to go viral. And the answer to your friend is absolutely not OK.

    Being a public person does not mean that anybody has ownership to the person.

    I find it extremely wrong to not respect the right to privacy.

    And I really do not understanding why it is so important to show off just because some body known has their child in the same school.

    There are way too much gossip going on, and I wonder, why don’t all these curious people get a life of their own.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh, I hate people who stop to look at and take pictures of car wrecks. It’s not okay.

      And I agree with you that it’s wrong to not respect a simple request of someone to take down the photos. It’s not a huge deal… to just take it down.

      It’s not like his request was egregious.

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  15. Parents should have all control over where their child’s picture is placed on the internet. I would be so angry if I was that child’s parent if the pictures were not taken down. I’d go so far as to speak to the school administration – they don’t have to take down the picture but could cover the child’s face. Not only is it a privacy issue, but if your friend is well known, it could be a security issue as well.

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    1. Wholeheartedly agree with you. I bet if he, with his public career took a picture of her child and posted it online, would probably get into a lot of shit. He’d never, ever, ever in a million years ever do that. But I think she needs to imagine how it would be if the tables were turned.

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  16. I absolutely agree with you. I have two good friends who have babies. I’ve asked both of them how they feel about sharing pictures of their children online. One is against it, but the other is all for it. I have plenty of adorable pictures on my phone because these babies are super cute and I spend a lot of time with them, but I feel like their parents still have the right to choose what they share and when. If I think a picture is share-worthy I’ll send it to my friends and let them decide what to do with it.

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    1. That’s a really good outlook – and absolutely the right way to go about it – sending a photo to your friends and letting them decide what to do with it. I bet they really appreciate you for that.

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  17. I posted a stack load of photos of my son when he was a baby, I mean loads. As he has gotten older the number of photos has decreased and we are at the stage, where I ask him if he is ok with a photo going up. Considering he wants to be a youtube star (sigh) he often says no.

    I also get where your friend comes from, I have friends in showbiz world and I have seen how careful they are. He can report the posts to facebook btw and they will take it down and possible suspend the account.

    In Monkey’s school, we are told we are not allowed to post photos of any child unless we have permission. This, is mainly because any child who has been adopted or fostered from a certain type of family, may have to keep their address, school and new name a secret from their biological family and by putting photos up there, its actually downright dangerous

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    1. That’s another side to the coin that I didn’t even think of. In the case of adoptions and foster care, or kids who’s parents have fled abusive relationships and whatnot, having their child’s face plastered to identifiable places could be harmful to the child and the parent.

      Thank you for bringing up such an important perspective.

      I really think as a society we ought to be more cognizant of the photos posted online of kids under 18.

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      1. We should be, my generation is the last to be able to have lived their childhood without it all being online, so its a brand new thing for me. The one thing I drill into my son, is once its out there, even if you delete it, its there.

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      1. You sound like a really down-to-earth parent. I appreciate that. There are a lot of people in this world who would be like ‘Yeah Boy, go on youtube and make ma million bucks!”

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      2. Thank you but if I thought he could do it and earn me millions I would have no problem with it and while I won’t wreck his dreams, he has to be realistic that now its nearly impossible to make money from it. Plus he needs skills he just doesn’t have like editing, a proper camera and its hard work, he just sees a 10 minute video and thinks well that is easy, when god knows how many hours goes into it.

        However, he is only 7, so he will learn and in the meantime, I will keep letting him record his videos and watching them over and over and over and over again

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  18. I completely agree that it should be the individual parents’ decision as to whether or not their child(ren)’s images are posted to social media. Once the kid is a legal adult, then it’s up to them. I’ve worked a number of children’s camps and summer programs, and whenever we have parents sign their kids up, part of the process involves a release that they can either agree to or not. If they don’t want their kids’ picture/video to be used in future promotional material, then we make a conscious effort to make sure those kids aren’t in any of the media we get during the event. I don’t think your friend is out of line at all to ask for those pictures to be removed and he absolutely has a right to privacy, just like those inconsiderate moms do. I know there are certain instances in life where we definitely forfeit our right to privacy, simply by going out in public. Not sure where you can go these days and escape the lens of some kind of closed circuit feed. At least, not in most populated areas. But for someone to greedily snap photos of someone else’s kid without consent or knowledge? That’s just wrong.

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    1. Thank you for your insights. I definitely agree with you. When I used to work at sports camps, we had all parents sign FOIP waivers to ensure we could take pictures of their kids. And if we couldn’t and their parent didn’t want photos taken of their kid, we’d put them in a bright neon yellow shirt so that we knew, throughout the days, that the kids in the NEON yellow shirts shouldn’t have their photos taken.

      FOIP protects people from companies, institutions, schools, organizations, etc… but the laws are a little grey when it comes to individuals. So I think, where the laws are a little grey, human beings ought to practice a little more respect.

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  19. I totally agree with this. My own daughter (teen) doesn’t like her photos being shared on the internet unless she’s approved the photo. I don’t post any pictures without their consent. When they were smaller I posted a couple here and there if I wanted to memory to show up in my newsfeed

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    1. That’s really great of you to listen to what your daughter wants. I see some ‘family vloggers’ on youtube openly laughing about how their kids don’t want to be on camera whilst they shove the camera in their kids faces and I’m all like… ‘You should be listening to your kids.’ It’s hard enough being a teenager without social media. I know you know what I mean there!

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      1. I feel sorry for celebrities children. The general public feel like they own them in the sense that they can approach them for photos and posting them on Facebook. The women in your story sounds very entitled. The person you are writing about should go to their lawyer to protect their child. As a whole, I feel the world community on social media should be protecting children’s autonomy better.

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  20. I rarely post pictures of my son online due to privacy reasons. I had recently received a form from the public school if I consent in having my son appear on their social media pages. I circled “no” as my response. The next day, my son’s teacher asked me “why” and I replied that due to the nature of my work, I don’t want my son’s picture appearing on the school website.

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    1. Those forms are appearing more and more these days, which I think are a very good thing. And I think its smart if you do circle no. I just think it’s hard for people to understand why you would because so few people on this earth seem to understand the ramifications of putting their kids online. Which is sad. It’s good the teacher asked though. You probably made her see a perspective she hadn’t yet thought of!

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      1. Definitely. I also know that there’s too many creepy perverts on the Internet who would try and save these type of pictures for their collection. It’s sickening 🤢

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      2. And you really never know where things can wind up.

        Also – how many people have full read the terms of service of instagram? Because I’m pretty sure that if Instagram wanted to, they could own any pictures on our pages. You could wake up tomorrow and have your kid plastered on billlboards all over the country because Instagram sold it.

        Would instagram do that? Doubtful. But the possibility is still there.

        Have you ever heard of Patrick J Adams? He’s an actor and he and his wife had a little girl last year. They’ve never posted a photo of the girls face but they’ve posted pictures of like… her fingers wrapped around their finger and stuff like that. One of the pictures they posted wound up on the cover of a novel for a book published in the UAE. When I read that and saw that someone showed him the cover I was like ‘wow! Now imagine if they’d shown her face!’

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      3. Never heard of the actor but oh my goodness…that is scary to hear his child’s photo ending up on a book cover 😨 I’m usually active on Instagram but lately I’ve been reconsidering my social media presence due to the constant BS from social media companies.

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    1. It’s crazy to me when people specifically use their children to become famous. I don’t understand it.
      Like… let’s let kids be kids as long as we can, please. Especially in this day and age when kids grow up faster than ever before.

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  21. UK law copyright is owned by the taker of the photo and – as long as a model release is signed they can publish.Publishing on the web is still publishing therefore it is actually against the law for the ‘photographer mothers’ to do this without the consent of the ‘model’ – which in this case unwittingly would be your friend. A solicitor’s letter should do the trick although too late now as it’s done but may stop them in future. Basically just let them know they can take photo’s but they pay £100 for each pic they publish, per country for every year whilst the photo is in circulation..which now would be forever.
    I must admit I totally agree with not sharing photos of children. Recently a friend shared a video of her daughter’s mess with the potty in her bedroom – I felt so sad for her daughter, I hope she grows to outlive the legacy her mother has left about her…these are things thankfully forgotten from my own past.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We have something similar in Canada too. But it only applies to institutions – business, schools, sports teams, etc… it doesn’t apply to an individual.

      He’s having his lawyer reach out to the mom to just kindly ask her to take it down. He’s not going to threaten her or anything, he just thinks she might be more inclined to listen if it comes from a lawyer since she doesn’t seem to care what he has to say. You know what I mean?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, I wish people could understand what ‘safeguarding children’ actually means!!! Let’s hope this woman listens. I feel that you are right about privacy in 2019 btw – it’s long gone, the most we can hope for now is to hope that the people who are watching are decent!

        Like

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