Millennial Mental Health

I don’t always like talk about it but my mental health is something that I am cognizant of on a daily basis. I want to make sure that I’m taking the necessary steps to look after myself and my well being.

I think that all too often millennials are criticized in the media, and in life, for being so open about mental health struggles. In reality, I don’t think we’re the first generation to have struggles with mental health, I just think that we’re the first generation to be open and honest about it.

I’m 99% positive that my father struggles with severe anxiety and 100% positive that he never has, nor will he ever, admit to that. It’s just not something that his generation does. Nevertheless, I digress.

Some days, I get lucky and there’s not a lot going on. Those are the days when I find the most calm. Those are the days when I am most alright with the world around me. I don’t have to put on a happy face, I don’t have to pretend with anyone, I can just be me. I appreciate those days.

And please don’t get me wrong, it’s not that I’m miserable. I’m not. I could be happier though. Because of this, it just gets exhausting trying to be happy-go-lucky for people. I know they don’t want to see me actual mood, so I spend a lot of my time wearing a mask.

Recently I saw a video of a reporter asking Meghan Markle ‘are you okay? Meghan, stunned at the reporter said ‘Not many people actually ask me that’. While I can’t even imagine what it’s like to be a member of the British Royal Family, seeing her answer actually broke my heart a little bit because I know there are so many people in the world who are trying to hide their struggle and put on that mask to not be a burden to those around them.

It is so important that we find places and spaces where we can be honest, both with ourselves and with other humans. That we can find a common ground and admit that not everything is okay all of the time and that is okay.

Millennials are keenly aware of our identity, where we fit into society and the struggles that come with that. I don’t think that makes us whiners like society paints us out to be. Personally, I think that makes us stronger. If you’re willing to acknowledge your demons, you’re more likely to face them head on.

How am I? I’m doing okay today. It’s one of those good days where there aren’t many people around and there isn’t a ton going on. I don’t have to put on the mask, I can just be. I’ve been laying pretty low this week to try and rest/get healthy again, so I think another low-key day will be good for me. My thoughts are a little sporadic, but I am hanging in there.

It’s important to remember to be good to yourself. Remember to treat yourself. Remember to look after yourself. Self-care is about doing things to look after yourself long-term. It isn’t about instant or short-term gratification.

Whatever generation you’re a part of, be good to yourself today, and every day. You’re worth it and your well being depends on it.

79 thoughts on “Millennial Mental Health

  1. It’s definitely healthy and strong to talk about it. Not only because you keep yourself in check (and don’t spend your life pretending), but there are so many people who think they’re the only ones who suffer these feelings. You’re doing a good thing….and I have great expectations for the millennial generation.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I wish we all could feel more free to talk about our mental health. I know it’s not always possible and not everyone has the people in their life or the platform like this to do so, but I think it’s definitely something we should all work towards.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Like you, I’ve struggled a ton with social anxiety. And not only am I a Millennial, but I’m also a first-generation Taiwanese-American, with parents who grew up in a culture that doesn’t really address mental health struggles, let alone believe they exist. It can be hard at times to talk to them about how I’m feeling, because they end up either criticizing (i.e. blaming me for doing things that caused the anxiety in the first place) or giving unsolicited advice on how to overcome it (instead of just listening and trying to understand). I love my family, but they aren’t good when it comes to dealing with such matters. I’ve found having friends and people outside of my family to talk to more beneficial, as they’re Millennials like myself and are going through the same issues as I am. Overall, having someone– family or not– to talk to lessens the burden of the anxiety at hand– always have a support network to count on when the going gets tough!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Oh you are so right. While I’ve never experienced your family’s culture, I can say I know how you feel when you say parents end up criticizing it or giving unsolicited advice. My mom says my anxiety isn’t anxiety it’s just a lack of desire to do things because I am lazy!

      I think you’re absolutely right. Having some people in your life, a circle, people who you can talk to – it absolutely lessens the burden. Also, you can learn from them and you guys can help each other. It’s really good to have a support system and I know not everyone has one. I guess my wish would be for everyone to be able to find their own support system!

      Liked by 4 people

  3. I never talked about things that pertained to ‘mental health’ until my own was in crisis.
    Now I can talk about it openly without fear of being belittled, or ostracized. I just figure if people are uncomfortable with me talking about it, it is on them and not me.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. While that’s a really great outlook, I think a lot of people would struggle with it because mental health issues are so ostracizing, we’re really quick to blame ourselves! You should teach your wisdom. Share what helps, share what got you to that point, this point where you’re able to be so open without fear. I bet a lot of people could learn from you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It has taken me quite a long time to really start the process of discovering who I really am. No religious masks, or societal demands.
        There is still more in me that needs works. The best thing for a start is to recognize that very thing.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. That’s great that you’re able to share your experiences now. I’m sure it helps others to know they’re not alone. I hope to get there someday. For now, I’ve gotten to the stage of sharing that I’ve gone through “hard times” or “struggles” without going into any of the details about what that means. -Nina

      Liked by 5 people

      1. That’s where a journal helps. I learned this while in treatment for mental health. We were told to write, scribble, or whatever. If you don’t want others to see, tear it up. Journal ling is the facet to let out all the pent up feelings.
        I started this blog because I felt it was one way to journal. It has taken several incarnations along the way.
        Just keep pushing forward, if you fall, pick yourself up, brush off your knees, and press forward again!

        Liked by 2 people

  4. Glad to hear that you’re doing well today 🙂 We’d be better off as a society if we regularly asked others how they’re doing. And not in a passing, just-trying-to-make-small-talk way, but genuinely. There’s far too many people who resort to the standard “I’m fine” answer when they’re anything but fine.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Yeah. There are far too many people who say ‘I’m fine’ when they’re not and there are far too many people who accept ‘I’m fine’ as an answer when they know the person isn’t! I think we could all benefit from being a little more caring, like you’ve outlined in your comment. Thank you for sharing ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re so right. There was a time when cancer was something that you just couldn’t mention. And now, people are very understanding of what happens and what people go through. The more we talk, the better we’ll be as a society. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Harry! I really appreciate it! You should still write your post too! The more we talk about as a whole, the less a stigma there is around it.

      Like

  5. I am definitely with you on this. I constantly assess my mental health and need to talk about it if I’m struggling. Some people just don’t get that and want to chastise me and others for it, but it’s a healthy thing that we should all do, if you ask me.

    Liked by 4 people

  6. I read something (not sure where) that was about the added stress of not being able to to bring ones self to work. As in needing to put on an act at work. It’s common among employees who are underrepresented in the workplace, such as LGBTQ individuals.

    Related to your post, I wonder how common it is that people don’t feel able to be themselves in life at all. I wonder what it’s doing to our society when we’re pretending to be a different version of ourselves.

    -Nina

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I think it’s probably really common that people don’t feel able to be themselves in life at all. I wrote a post about social anxiety a while back and it’s one of my most popular posts on this blog all together. That tells me that a lot of people are dealing with social anxieties that keep them from being true to themselves,

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I love your post and I have just started writing articles relating to my own journey with mental health. As a community, we need to talk about these things and take the stigma away. I wish you the best, and always be good to yourself.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I wholeheartedly agree with you. Talking about it is soo important. So many people don’t understand it right now and I think if we talked about it more, then we could really teach others.

      Like

  8. LOVE THIS! I am not a millennial, I’m 44, but I agree wholeheartedly 🙂 I’ve had my fair share of depression, postpartum depression, anxiety and am now dealing with the chronic fatigue/fibromyalgia and other weird symptoms brought on by Epstein Barr. Illnesses that can’t be SEEN, and many times the comments of others can leave you feeling worse. Mental Illness is real and the most helpful thing is to be understood and seen as valid. No one asks to feel like shit.

    Liked by 5 people

  9. Your post relays a sense of reflection and self knowledge that I believe the millennials are one of the first generations to posses (by quite a large majority) openly and unashamedly and this is such a great thing. Other generations will build on these discoveries just as the millennials have. There has been a turning point in history – I can’t pin it down – but I do believe that this sort of self reflection is becoming so wide spread that it is changing humans – perhaps for the first time in history because we are capable of changing ourselves. Could be wrong but I’m hopeful. Great post.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I would love it if other generations became more open. I think that if my dad ever talked about his anxiety, it would sincerely help him a lot. All generations can benefit from talking their truths about mental health.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I think that the Millennials are inheriting a horrible world that just keeps getting worse. It’s natural to get a deep psychological response from it! Please stay well. I believe the insights brought by your generation might help to figure out this crazy spiral we all seem to be in. There are many of us who would stand shoulder to shoulder with whoever wants to improve the world.

    Liked by 4 people

  11. This is why I love your blog. You’re not afraid to talk about mental health by being real and honest about the struggles. It’s a shame that the media wants to put down others on talking about mental health when this is a real and viable issue happening around us.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I think society plays up mental health struggles as making people weak, which makes people fear talking about it. When in reality, no one suffering from mental health struggles is weak and talking about it could probably have so much benefit to their lives ❤

      Like

  12. You’re absolutely right that while mental health struggles are not a “new” issue, it’s only in the last few years that they’ve been spoken about openly. Previously the subject was swept under the carpet, and barely acknowledged. Interestingly, here in the UK Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have ruffled a few feathers by raising the subject publicly … the traditional British way of dealing with this sort of thing has been to keep a stiff upper lip, in other words to say nothing and just get on with it. The modern, more open approach, is definitely the right way to go but traditionalists will continue to have problems with it. Discussing openly the way society helps people who are struggling with their mental health is in itself going to help others adjust their thinking, and your post is part of that process. Well done for raising it.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I’ve heard that about British people, actually. That you kind of just… grin and bear it, and it’s a cultural thing to just pretend it’s not there.

      One would think Prince Harry has likely suffered with mental-health issues in his life, losing his mom at such a young age with the whole world weighing in on it then and still 20+ years later, And Meghan, I hope the two of them together are able to maybe open up some of the British norms to a new norm of it being okay to talk about it. We could all be a little bit better from talking about it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I hope so too, but parts of “the establishment” are turning against Harry and Meghan because they are challenging some behavioural norms of the Royal Family and upper classes. Let’s wish them luck, because sadly I think they’ll need it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Perhaps challenging the behavioural norms of the Royal Family and the upper class is a good thing. `We could all stand to evolve in this world, even those of us with blue blood or who marry into blue blood…

        Like

    1. I would agree that your generation really doesn’t talk about it either. And, being not that much older than me, sometimes I feel like you’re a part of my generation. I just want to bring you in and force you to talk about it. Is that weird?

      Liked by 1 person

  13. More people need to be open about mental health. It’s detrimental to society to hide their problems. Hiding ensures that they never heal. Then their problems get worse and eventually spill out on to others via abuse, negligence, alcoholism, addiction, and even homicide. You sharing with others about mental health helps defeat the stigma. Plus, you encourage others to open up.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I agree, more people do need to be more open about it. Talking about it could probably really help society as a whole.

      I almost wonder how much alcoholism and drug addiction, suicides, could be prevented if people had an outlet to talk about their struggles, to get help from.

      Like

  14. Thank you for pointing out that mental health issues have been plaguing people forever, but we’re probably the first generation being open about it.
    And thank you for mentioning Megan Markle. It makes me SO MAD that people are so mean to her. Yes, she’s wealthy and beautiful and married a freaking prince but that doesn’t mean that she doesn’t still have struggles and emotions and demons. Every single move she makes and every single word that comes out of her mouth is picked apart and critiqued. She doesn’t have some easy life.
    Re-blogging.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I think the point about Meghan is exactly what you touched on – you can seem like you have it all together and still have struggles. Everyone has struggles. And we should all talk about it more. Whether you’re Meghan Markle, Stacy Alderman, or anyone who’s read this thread ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Reblogged this on Quirky, Confused & Curvy and commented:
    Had to pass this along. I agree 100% with everything here. Millennials are constantly being degraded for being “over sensitive” because of our mental health issues, but the fact of the matter is that this epidemic has been happening for a long time and we’re the first ones to talk about it.
    I also completely agree with her stance on celebrities, Meghan Markle being the example here. Just because someone is beautiful and wealthy doesn’t mean she doesn’t have emotions or struggles. We’ll all human.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. The ability to externalize your thoughts, reservations, and worries is so important. Mental health begets health in the physical and we have to appreciate the connection to really maximize our output as functional human beings. Great post!

    Follow us back at science-lion if you like!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. The ability to externalize your thoughts, reservations, and worries is so important. Mental health begets health in the physical and we have to appreciate the connection to really maximize our output as functional human beings. Great post!
    Follow us back at science-lion.com if you like!

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Great post. It is true that my generation didn’t discuss mental health openly. But privately people did.

    I think it is important topic to recognise. Important that we recognise that we all go up and down, and there are ways to deal with it.

    But, sometimes when someone ask how are you? – they are actually being polite, and they might not actually want to know! I have been there when I was younger, and it can be quite a shock to find out later they don’t care less.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. You’re right, when people ask how are you and they’re just being polite, they’re probably not the person you want to open up to. That’s why I really hope that everyone finds an outlet. Everyone deserves somewhere they can talk about it. Everyone deserves those people who’ll listen, no matter how hard it gets.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I believe everything happens for a reason… but that doesn’t mean things still don’t hurt. Recent events in my life have brought me to a state that I hoped I would never be in again. I happened to open my email this evening and this post popped up. I read it and I almost cried. I can relate to everything you are saying and I just wanted to let you know that reading this helped me a little. So thank you for your honesty and taking the time to write this post. ❤️

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Awe, my dear, I am sending you some love from afar ❤ If I could hug you I would. I hope whatever you're going through gets better soon. Or at least, closer to a new normal again.

      Like

  20. Prioritizing our health, whether it be physical or mental, is something most of us don’t do. Being of an ‘older’ generation, I’m quite proud of you for standing up and out, vocalizing what all, ALL, of us deal with in varying degrees: staying emotionally/mentally fit! Thanks for this post!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for reading and for your kind comment ❤ I think it's important for everyone to focus on their mental health and how they can better themselves. Everyone, regardless of your age. No human is free from struggle.

      Like

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