Lest We Forget

My grandfather never spoke of the war. At least not that I can recollect. And, in spite of all of the things I’m sure that he saw during WW2, in spite of all of the friends he lost, the worries he had, the struggles he went through, he was one of the happiest people I’ve ever known. I have profound admiration for him, all that he accomplished in his lifetime and the legacy he left behind with, not only my family, but everyone he knew.

My cousin Ian, since serving several tours in Afghanistan, has gone on to become a police officer who continues to deal with some of the most difficult situations one could possibly imagine. I have never, not once, heard him talk about the horrors he’s experienced with war, or continues to experience working in major crimes. He is, to this day, one of the most positive people that i know who always manages to see the good in life. I have a profound admiration for him and the impact he leaves on my family and in this world.

I wear a piece of them in my heart wherever I go and keep a piece of every person, past and present, who has served and sacrificed and continues to serve and sacrifice so that I can have the blessings I have today.  I will never forget. 

Thank You.

It’s not enough, but it’s all I have.

May we always remember the people who are the reasons for the peace we have today.

13 thoughts on “Lest We Forget

  1. I will never forget. Thank you for sharing. I had two great uncles who fought in the First World War. One lost his life. The other was in a ship when it was torpedoed but he survived. Naturally I never knew either of them, but I’ve read the letters of my great uncle who died (he moved to Canada before he joined up) and I think we would have got on very well.

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    1. Imagine the lives these men and women lead and the things they must’ve seen and experience! My life is a cake-walk compared to their’s. But even still, I bet they were filled with so many interesting stories. That’s why I used to ask my grandpa about it. Yeah, I know it wasn’t fun and it wasn’t anything he wanted to glorify, but I also think their bravery deserves to be talked about and commemorated, ya know? I’m sure the same is also very true of your uncles.

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  2. I’m one of the different guys, as I found talking openly about my experiences helps. Back in 2014, I caught myself beginning to slide into depression. I’d let the post-traumatic stress build up in me and it was getting worse. Luckily, my demons were weaker than those that others face, and I called an anonymous hotline specifically for Marines. I talked to some guy for about an hour and that really helped. Ever since then, I keep my demons out in the open because that’s where I have the most control of them. But we all fight our battles differently (which is actually the theme of my book series).

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    1. I definitely do think that talking about it helps. I remember you commenting on the Tale of Two Millennials that you served. I bet talking about it has really helped you. Thank you for being you and for all that you’ve done for people like me to be able to lead our simple and blessed lives.

      I also think your stories are important stories to live on because when we, the people who haven’t experienced it, know what happens, we can help push society forward, and help with real, tangible evidence of what happened for those who are so quick to forget. I hope you always share your stories.

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    1. Thank You. I like to hope that he’d be impressed. He was a pretty remarkable man, came to Canada on his own when he was eighteen. Left for the war at 21. From what I do know, he was stationed in Holland for a while. He always bought as many poppies as he could and gave them to all of his grandkids to make sure we were always wearing poppies and we always knew how lucky we were.

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    1. Their sacrifices are exactly why we get to be who we are today. They are the founders of this life. As cheesy as that might sound, it’s true. We’d be in a whole different world without them.

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