Thinking out loud.

I applied for a job that I’m perfectly qualified for, suited for, could rock better than any other candidate on the planet, and I know that. This job wouldn’t just be a job to bide time, this would be a career move. A career move that could open up some serious opportunities for me moving forward.

This job is in Calgary. I am in British Columbia. I am more than willing to move, and wanting to move.

The HR Manager responded to my resume submission with an email that contained her name and email address in it and a note that says “In the meantime, please feel free to contact me with any questions you might have”.

It wasn’t a LinkedIn Automated response, or message. It was taking the time to send me an email response stating they received my resume.

Would it be bothering her if replied to her email (resubmitting my resume in the email so she knows what candidate I am based in the email alone) letting her know my desire and willingness to move? Would that come across as needy? Is there any way that makes me look bad? I can see the benefits to doing so, but I am not allowing myself to do it because I’m worried it will make my application look bad and that I should just let go and let be what be…

Should I email her? Should I leave it alone?

84 thoughts on “Thinking out loud.

      1. So I just discovered that you can google this (surprise surprise!) and there are some good questions you can ask like ‘What is the biggest challenge facing the company right now?’ I guess something like that could help you prepare for interview?

        Liked by 1 person

  1. I would respond but not resubmit your resume. I’d open a conversation and build a bit of a relationship. I don’t think it’s bad to state that you’re really passionate about the role once a conversation gets going at all. But I’m afraid, it’s their decision if they want to hire you so resubmitting your resume probably wouldn’t improve your chances if it’s the same resume, if that makes sense?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Okay, thank you for your advice. My only reason for submitting my resume was in case she’s got like 300 resumes for the position, she’d have mine in the email rather than having to hunt for it. That being said, I can definitely just start a conversation and put my name in the back of her mind. What you say makes total sense. Thank you.

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  2. In my opinion, you should contact her so that you can tell about your abilities and experiences in detail. I guess that you have seen enough of ‘let be what be’. An human interaction is better to know a person rather than reading a resume. You should contact her, may be it will be in your favor. A regret later is far better than doing and fail.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I think what you need to, is stand out from other the crowd… And the best way (in my opinion) is to go there directly and say: Hey, here I am. I dont want this to slip out from my hands and to leave it for someone else to decide… I wanted to see you face in face because I am the best that can get job done… and blah blah blah… sell yourself.. I dont think it is good idea to focus too much on the fact that you are willing to move…of course, say it…but dont put to much focus on it… I hope this is helpful… I am aware that it is maybe strange advice and that maybe it doesnt suit your personality…. but you have to stand out in some way

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for the advice. Calgary is about a twelve hour drive from me and about $800 by plane, so it’s not feasible at the moment to just show up there. If I lived nearer, I might consider making a day trip to pop in, but right now I need to find another way to stand out.
      Thank you so much for the suggestion, though. I really appreciate it! It was a very thoughtful comment that got me thinking about how I could stand out.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Contact her, show that you are keen. There is definitely no harm in that, at all. Got everything crossed that this goes so well for you. You deserve that and the world.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Contact her with sincere earnestness, and find an anecdote marrying your skills with the job.
    Your skill as a writer won’t allow you to have it come off as pleading.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I havent been a manager in some time, when I was when we were hiring the HR manager emailed candidates directly whom were qualified based on their resume. Most of the others got the canned automated response. So check #1 (if its like when I was a manager) they think you are qualified, you have your in. Reply with a thank you, and a question, something general is always good. They are probably getting dozens of emails from other people, so dont get to technical and dont make a question up. Email if you have a question, otherwise a “Thank you so much for contacting me, Im looking forward to discussing the job with you at length soon” (something along those lines)

    Use your instincts here, you have plenty of experiences yourself. When I was hiring I was never able to get to all the emails from applicants, it was overwhelming. Good Luck.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. Go for it, especially since she said it was OK. I also heard advice the other day that I’m trying to follow, which is “There’s no permanent record of applying for jobs,” so going for it isn’t going to hurt you.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Do not resubmit your resume. First, it looks needy, second, most likely your resume is already processed and entered into their internal system. However, do reach out and say how you are excited about this position, and how excited you are that it is in Calgary and that you are looking to relocate. Stating that you are willing to relocate is important, and the enthusiasm is important, too.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I straight up took your advice on this comment and contacted her today. Since you seem so wise, I figured I might as well try. Can’t hurt, right? And I didn’t submit my resume. My only reason for considering emailing her my resume was so that she didn’t have to search through her pile to find my application. That being said, when I read your comment I determined I didn’t want to look needy at all!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Yes, it looks needy. I wouldn’t have hired somebody that did that. You know I have your resume. I know I have your resume. I also know that you’re willing to move because you sent your resume. If you want to respond, come up with some really good question, maybe two, but no more than that and ask them. Make it about their role in the company and the hard work or good that they do. Something as simple as “Why do you love working for this company?” or “What do you think employees are most proud about in working for the company?” That kind of positivity will jump out at them, not desperate passive aggressive gestures that say, “Look at me!!!!”

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    1. From my hiring experience, we always wonder whether a person REALLY ready to relocate. Sometimes people submit their resumes just for a practice interview. Also, sometimes people assume they will receive a relocation bonus. I always like to have a confirmation that a person is willing to relocate (unless it is in the resume already).

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      1. I guess my desire to tell them I’m willing to move is because I’m worried they’ll count me out due to my present address, so I’m wanting to remind them that I’ll move. Then again though, if they’re willing to count me out due to my present address, then I wouldn’t really ever have a chance anyway.

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      2. Exactly. I think if you show a little enthusiasm in whatever you ask them in your email, it’s understood you’d like the opportunity to go there.

        My only other thought would be to outright lie and say you’re moving there for other reasons, so nobody should worry about your current address, but since I’m required to say lying is never good, lying is never good.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Make sure to tell them you’ll move on your own dime if that’s the situation. That jumps out because like H said, half the time candidates expect a relocation package that companies cannot afford.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Oh, I’m so over practice resumes. (At least that’s what I’m going to call adventures in job hunting) I’m ready for someone to hire me so I can make their company better. lol

        Liked by 1 person

    2. As a recruiter I disagree with this. Most candidates are so shy and so not good at selling themselves that worrying about looking too needy is the last damn thing they should do. The important thing is to make it about what you can do for the employer – save time, make money. Etc. I disagree that V, at this stage, should ask the HR manager how she likes working there or anything along those lines. Save that for the face to face interview.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I get your point of view. Actually between the two of us we just demonstrated while life is so challenging for job hunters. Heck man, you don’t know if you’ll get the manager / HR who wants the positivity you just described, or the HR / Manager who does a big eyeroll at anything she thinks is “phony” / too positive. And I’ve been an unemployed job hunter, so I know how it is. Bless your souls, job hunters!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. It probably reflects who we were as employees. The best employee I ever had walked off the street, said I should hire her, and showed me examples of her work. That impressed the hell out of me, so I hired her on the spot. It’s the kind of thing I would have done 20 years earlier. I can teach skills, I can’t teach passion.

        Liked by 2 people

  10. When I applied for jobs in the area where I wanted to move, I stated my intention to move prominently in my cover letter. I know some automated systems don’t allow for a cover letter though, so that makes it harder. But, I absolutely agree with Karac Alvaron’s comment. 100 percent. Good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve stated my desires to move outright, but I find with a lot of companies in the past, they’ve written me off just because I’m not a local so they think it’ll take longer and be more of a hassle than they want to commit to. Which sucks. I think that’s what happened with a rejection I got earlier this week. I don’t want to get counted out of this job though. This job is me, to a T. I want it.

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  11. I wouldn’t resubmit your resume, but it would be a good move to ask any questions you have and to thank her for reaching out to let you know your application was received and to communicate your excitement for the opportunity to apply.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Yes! The biggest problem I see with candidates after laziness is cowardice. Do it. You believe you are the perfect person for this job. Find a better way to say just that. You’d love to interview and show what you can offer the company. It’s not about you – it’s what you can offer and how you can save time or increase money. I have wondered if as a marketer you have some kind of portfolio that you can send companies in moments like this? If so send it or make one.

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      1. I didn’t resubmit my resume. Honestly, I only suggested that thinking if she had several hundred resumes, if mine wa sattached it would be easy for her to put a resume to my email… rather than having to take a deep dive for it. But I see from the comments that was really warned against so I didn’t do it.

        Liked by 1 person

      1. LMAO! Well how much does a work visa cost? Shit, you got me seriously thinking about this now. You should see our website, it’s fairly awful compared to that of our peers and I have no idea how to fix that or get more traffic. They’re not in a hurry to get marketing, but if the recruiter said, “well I know one who is really good you can get on contract long distance” they’d sit up and at least listen.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It’s roughly $8,000. At least that’s what the cost was for my friend who works for Hewlett Packard down in the states. It’s a long, drawn out process that can take up to six months if you’re not a high-profile case (IE Professional Athlete) to get approval for because an employer, the sponsor, has to prove that no one within the United States is capable of doing what the employee is capable of doing.

        My friend, the one who works for HP, says that since the Trump administration has come to power, they’ve decreased the amount of work visas given each year by an estimated 30%. This is because Trump wants to put forth the public notion that he’s not letting foreigners stealing American jobs.

        So already, prior to this current president, it was a long-shot in the dark getting a visa to the States, but since then, you pretty much have to be the cream of the freaking crop because, you’re calculated in the same pool with famous people (like the Biebs as a Canadian example, or all the famous actors and actresses who work and live in Hollywood who aren’t American) when they talk of how many Visas are granted each year.

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      3. Holy shit! This is eye opening all around. Well, I had sent you an e-mail earlier in this, but yeah – no employer will jump through those hoops and Lord almighty – 8 grand! Dang that sucks. Very educational though.

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      4. Generally, you have to be a pretty damn valuable employee to a company for them to sponsor you with the $8,000 Visa Annually. Nobody’s going to pay that for a job that typically pays 50-60 grand. lol

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Actually, I could tell you a petty freaking ridiculous story about my friend who works for HP. But I might email that to you because that information shouldn’t be shared publicly, it could hurt his present status.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I have a feeling the automatedness of the process might put me into a maybe column rather than a yes column, which was why I wanted to email them. And I did, today. Crossing my fingers.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. British Columbia is beautiful and wonderful but it’s filled with family members who drive up my anxiety and make things more difficult than they need to be.

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      1. Personality wise, this position that i just applied for on Monday that would be a career move for me – it’s well suited for my personality. Most positions I apply for are just run of the mill office jobs. Nothing really special about them or nothing that makes me think it’s any better than anywhere else. Most jobs are like that though, I think because people don’t understand what marketing can or cannot do for you.

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      2. Cool. Are you in a position to take your time, or is there financial pressure to get a job? The name of your blog suggests you had some sort of crisis. I think for somebody as intelligent and dynamic as you, finding the right thing is especially important, and your mental health would suffer in the wrong job. I may be wrong and reading into it wrong.

        I’m currently being helped through that process by a charity, of truly finding something that fits with my core values, and I can do. You obviously have a lot of writing skill and a desire to help others.

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      3. I feel like you’ve seen into my soul. I think the name of my blog is just a suggestion to my feeling a little lost in life, like I don’t belong anywhere and I don’t know how I fit, or where I fit.

        Up until December I was, for the most part, supporting myself. But no one has wanted any consulting this month, so money has been very tight, just in time for Christmas. I’m hoping consulting picks up again in January. Right now my parents and my boyfriend have been helping me get by, for the most part, which I am grateful for.

        What kind of a job are you searching for? That’s good that you have support to help you through this stage as well. Honestly, it’s such a weird place to be in, I’ve been feeling very lonely in my little… in-between stage.

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      4. Everything you’re saying sounds extremely typical of people who discover later in life, that they have ADHD or autism, which overlap.

        Weirdly, I was also self-employed doing consulting, up until I lost motivation. My work didn’t fit my core values, which are to help people, or core passions, one of which is writing. (I was doing freelance computer programming). Whilst I enjoy programming, I find it impossible to sit down all day, much less be in an office environment. And working from home led to social isolation, which was terrible as I love being around people. I had all the classic signs of depression.

        Then I came across this TED talk about ADHD: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JiwZQNYlGQI
        I feel like you would relate to her.

        For me, that video changed my life forever, and started a ton of self-education about ADHD, and eventually OCD and autism. Just in the last few months I discovered accidentally, that autism is a big part of my makeup, which involved even more destroying of stereotyped misconceptions!

        The overall term for these kinds of brain differences, and their effect on peoples’ lives, is neurodivergence. A high proportion of people with ADHD end up self-employed by the age of 30. They struggle to fit in. And they really, really have a need to follow their passions. I 100% relate to that loneliness.

        Btw ADHD and autism are highly genetic, and often occur alongside OCD or anxiety. If you have family history of those, that would be important.

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      5. There are some things I resonate with in that video, but some things I don’t. Mostly the inattentiveness aspect. If I’m not interested in something, you couldn’t pay me $1,000,000 to listen to it. Hmmm. Maybe I should look into this more. Thank you for sharing this with me.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Yeah, each person with those things is different, especially amongst autism. But yeah, if you only relate to some of the things, that’s still beneficial, to know there are others like you in those ways. Haha, the $1m comment was gratifying to read.

        No problem at all, and good luck with it!

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