What causes blogging burnout?

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Over the past fifteen months I’ve seen a lot of really good bloggers up and quit. They stop coming online, or they delete their pages all together. People come and people go, that’s a fact of life. But burnout, is that avoidable? What causes burnout? What causes people to go so quickly? Even the promising bloggers, they say hasta-la-vista faster than anyone could say ‘please don’t give up’. Why?

People think blogging is easy. Too many people believe that maintaining a successful blog is simple. Too many people believe that all they have to do is hit publish and people will like/love/leave comments and subscribe. Over the night thousands of people will magically find their blog and they’ll be such a hit that people will hang off every word they say.

People take personal offense when expectation doesn’t meet reality. Far too many people will bitch and moan if they don’t get the number of comments on their post that they think they deserve. Instead of taking the opportunity to share, and be grateful for the opportunity to share, people will get angry if their post doesn’t get enough attention. This can lead to blogging burnout quite quickly. Anyone looking for, hoping for or seeking attention and gratification from others in what they post will likely always be disappointed with the results, no matter if it was five people who viewed or 5,000.

People lack the work-ethic needed to run a successful blog. In a world more connected than ever before, people seek content from online sources 24 hours a day, seven days per week. Anyone who runs a successful blog knows that they need to put time and effort into the posts they’re making and the content they’re sharing. Showing up every now and again to share something and expect a reaction is naive. A dedicated reader wants to come back to a blog and find something new to discover. If any potential reader has to come back again and again and again in hopes of finding something new, they’re going to give up quickly. If they give up quickly, the blogger tends to give up shortly thereafter.

People try too hard to be ‘trendy’. Just because something is being talked about on the internet does not mean that it’s going to bring any more traffic to a blog by speaking about it. A blog should be a reflection of the person composing it, not a reflection of trending topics from week to week to week.

People put too much money into their blog, assuming that monetary investment will equal success. Between premium/buisness accounts, custom layouts, custom logos, social media advertisements, google advertisements, taking blogging courses and son on and so forth, there are plenty of ways to spend plenty of money on a blog. That being said, spending money on a blog does not mean that blog is going to be successful. Spending money on a blog is a lot like spending money on a gym membership. No one would purchase a gym membership and assume that the simple act of having that membership means they will get six-pack abs, yet people will purchase all the bells and whistles for their account and assume that means their blog will make the money immediately. Unfortunately, life isn’t full of quick fixes.

What are some tips, tricks and tools that you use to avoid blogging burnout? Have you ever suffered blogging burnout? What brought you back? Also, do you have any blogs that you absolutely loved reading which the blog owner quit blogging? What do you think stopped them from returning to their blog?


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Please take any and all tips, tricks and suggestions that you read on this blog, and beyond, with a grain of salt. Blogging is not a one size fits all journey, so take what works for you and leave what doesn’t.

Sending successful thoughts your direction!

88 thoughts on “What causes blogging burnout?

  1. I’ve had weeks where I wanted to quit. My content felt stale. My readers had gone stagnant. I had to take a minute to reset and remember why I decided to start a blog. Because my blog is so personal, sometimes it’s hard to write about what is going on. I’ve committed to honesty and not sugar coating so when things are ugly it can be difficult to share. It’s been so worth it to power through though. People I know that I bump into around town will tell me how much they love my blog and it makes me remember why I’m doing it. It’s all about showing people that life is crazy and not perfect and that that is okay.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I’ve always appreciated your blog because of your honesty. I’m not a mom and, let’s face it, not anywhere near the same place as you in life, but I come across your posts when I see them on my feed and I can’t help but see how genuine you are through what you share. Life is crazy. Your life is really crazy. And I appreciate your honesty on your blog. I know I don’t really say that a lot. OR EVER. But I just wanted to let you know that you’re amazing.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Awe! Thank you so much! I’m really glad that you enjoy it. It’s nice to know that it feels relevant even to people who don’t have kids or know me personally. Many of my followers know me and so sometimes I worry that they read because they know me if that makes any sense. I love the honesty in your blog as well. It’s why, in the sea of blogs out there, I choose to read yours. Please don’t forget that you are amazing too!

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  2. It really depends on the purpose of the blog and the owners feelings towards it. I have a passion for writing poetry in my free time, so I post when I write because I enjoy sharing those feelings with others and receiving feedback. I also have a blog about my work, but I’m never sure what to write or why I’m writing, I’ve just heard it’s important in my industry and I haven’t made it routine, so it suffers. Lastly, I’ve got a personal blog, just to keep track of trying to improve my personal life and health. Not much progress on that front, so not much to write about. 😅

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I agree, when what you write is standalone such as poetry or fiction, it doesn’t matter if it’s sporadic, especially within WordPress since stuff comes up in the Reader automatically.

      I can see how it matters more for biographical blogs though, or some other kinds of blogs.

      Also it really depends on your intentions, as these ‘shoulds’ only apply to people trying to deliberately grow a blog and increase followers, which isn’t an inherent part of blogging.

      Liked by 4 people

    2. Three blogs! That’s a lofty goal. Do you update your work on regularly? If you say not much progress is made on your personal blog, does that mean this blog (Cynical Wordsmith) is the one that gets updated the most?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ve tried previously to start updating my work one more regularly, but between forgetting images, being too busy, too boring, or being too repetitive, I just couldn’t get in the habit, so I believe I’ve had three different points where I’ve tried to “start” it.
        The personal one is something I just started this year, I’ve journaled previously and used to keep a bullet journal but never chronicled my life digitally, so I thought I would give that a shot.
        Yes, Cynical Wordsmith is my most frequently updated, but I wish the muses were kinder these days so it could be even more frequent.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I think it’s important to have other ventures to invest in. I have a podcast, YouTube channel, and self-published novels to my name. If you get bored from blogging, you could always rotate to something else. Go back when you’re feeling recharged. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You must be a busy guy! What’s your favourite platform to use for a communication vehicle – the blog, the podcast or the Youtube channel? Do you use all of them to promote your books?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. If I had to choose I’d go with the blog because I’ve always been a writer. I use them to promote my books and my take on certain things. All my platforms are in the infancy stages at the moment. But it’s the thought of growing and expanding them that excites me.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s a very good point as well! High hopes, good intentions but very little to say when it comes to sitting down and writing, or filming, or recording…

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  4. I think a lot of bloggers have a very concrete vision of their long term goals, and it stops them from taking the small steps needed to make they’re blog successful. My main blogging goals are daily, not so much long term. I also never set a goal that I have no control over, such as views or how many likes a post will get. I see people talking about goals like that and it doesn’t surprise me when they burn out. It’s not like you can’t improve those numbers, but you certainly can’t control them.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. That’s the truth – there are a lot of things with respect to blogging that cannot be controlled and yet people will get extremely sad/frustrated/angry over them. If they could only take that energy they feel over lack of numbers and put it into productivity surrounding their blog, I feel like they’d be happier with their blog overall.

      I’m a lot like you. I take things day by day. Thinking too far ahead feels as though it would be very overwhelming.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. “People take personal offense when expectation doesn’t meet reality.”
    “People try too hard to be ‘trendy’”

    I think these two pretty much explain it. If you’re doing something out of passion and because the act of doing it gives you pleasure (before considering how others react to it), then it doesn’t matter if it’s hard, and it needn’t be stressful. You take it or leave it, based on whether you enjoy doing it or not. And others will take it or leave it depending on whether they like it too, and it’s nice if they do but no harm done if they don’t!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. You’re absolutely correct.

      If you’re enjoying blogging, you’ll put the time into it – no matter how much time it takes. You find the time. It’s like anything else in life – if it’s important, you make the time. If it’s not, then you won’t!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 🙂. The trick is not to confuse important with superficially desirable, which can be hard to distinguish when something is desirable enough.

        As a random example, scratching eczema can feel like the only thing ever worth doing in the universe, during the brief moments of extreme high it gives you 😑. But it’s definitely not important! Lol.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I really appreciate this post!!! I’m having a lot of blog uncertainty these days. It comes and goes, the uncertainty. I get anxious bcs of advice I’ve read to stick to one micro-niche or no one will want to read more, but sometimes I want to talk about social anxiety and sometimes I want to talk about motherhood and sometimes I want to talk about perfectionism and so on… I think this is where I am most prone to burnout — overthinking and obsessing over the “right way” to blog so that I can enjoy it but also bring interesting content to those who might read it.

    This was a rambly comment. Anyway thank you for this post!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. No rambly at all. It’s actually really relatable. The biggest thing that I’d like to point out is that you don’t have to be pegged into any niche. Your blog really should be a reflection of you and, I’m pretty certain, you’re not a one dimensional human being. You don’t just like only one thing and that’s it. So… write about what you’re passionate about. Share things you’re appreciative of. Find people you connect with and they’ll connect with you – whether they’re mom’s or anxiety sufferers or blushy gingers from other parts of the world!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you V!!! This blogging community restores my faith in online humanity.

        And you’re so right — I’m not (or don’t think of myself as) as 1D human. So it would be strange to show just 1D of my life.

        Btw I don’t know if I mentioned it in earlier comments but I really enjoyed your interview on the Cerrato Mom Podcast 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    2. I took some time to read your blog tonight and really enjoyed what I saw. I wouldn’t worry about sticking to one subject. We write blogs about life not business or science. Life is multidimensional and has so many topics to cover. That whole niche-blog thing just doesn’t work. Our niche is life and life is wakadoo. Keep writing what speaks to your heart and the readers will follow. You rock!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. I’ve been blogging since 2015 and to be quite honest when I started I had no idea what to expect. But I always blogged about what I loved, I wrote from the heart and when people started to read and connect and the conversations started, I felt as though it grew a life of its own. I’ve never wanted to stop blogging but there are times when I feel less inspired and real life takes over. Not quite burn out but a loss of interest, but it’s always been temporary. Overall though it’s a balance and I consider the blogging community an absolute blessing, especially in the times we’re in now. Take care. ☺️

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I love your take on this. Honestly, I also love hearing that you always seem to wind up back here, even when you take time off. Sounds like you’re a really great blogger. Thanks for sharing, I have no followed you ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  8. With millions upon millions of personal blogs online, it’s highly unlikely that you’ll have thousands of followers by the end of your first week. There’s simply too much content for people to view. Focus on what’s true to you and the right people will return to your blog. It’s more important to have quality readers than quantity. In my opinion, anyway. Great post, as usual.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your point is so valid, yet there are a lot of people who seem to believe that they can just hit publish and the masses will follow as though they’re.. who’s a hip celebrity these days? I think that’s why I dig your blog, though. I dig it because it’s absolutely unlike any other blog I’ve seen. You’ve mastered the art of independent content creation.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, I don’t see anything wrong with purchasing a premium account, if you want it, have the money and are going to use it. But if someone has very little extra money to spend and they don’t know a ton about blogging, I caution them against investing at first. I tell them to get their feet wet before they start sinking money into things. You know what I mean?

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I’ve been blogging for over six years now, and I’ve seen a lot of great bloggers come and go. Much of it has to do with just commitment: sometimes, it’s understandable that life just gets in the way, and blogging goes by the waste side as a result. Others might stop because the stats don’t work out for them (e.g. low views, likes, comments). At the end of the day, it’s all about discipline, whether to blog for passion or just to make a quick buck– efforts needs to be put into it!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Commitment is a big thing. You raise a valid point as well that some people – they run out of time. They get married, they have kids they have business, they have things that take them away.

      I know you’ve talked about how long you’ve been blogging – I just wanted to add that you might be one of the longest running blogs that I do follow. 🙂 You’re clearly very committed to your blog!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I would be lying if I didn’t say that I had to take a year off from writing on my other blog, just because I was starting to feel drained from daily blogging: I’ve since returned to writing on it and not daily, and I admit, being gone for so long has taken a toll on my site traffic and view count. And I’ve also seriously considered monetizing my sites after building up a sizable audience over the years, but I’ve never took the leap. What I worry about is sacrificing quality content for money, and that it’ll ruin my passion for writing. For the moment, I’m happy writing for fun, but we’ll have to see where this journey goes!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I loved your post! You are right. I have been absent from blogging because of exams and when I came back, I couldn’t post, I thought it’s pointless and when I read your post, I realised that perhaps one of the reasons you wrote must be true for me. I will check out your other posts too, and tips ofcourse, I need them! Have a good day!🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I hope that your exams went well! The world is going through a crazy time right now so if things don’t flow freely from your brain, don’t put stress on yourself. It’ll come eventually! Stay safe and stay healthy ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes. My exams went good except they my one exam got postponed because of the crisis. It’s a situation of uncertainty and frustration. And you are right, I think introspection and rest might just do good for now. Have a nice day! Stay safe too😊

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Sounds like you’re doing it for the right reasons and that you get a lot of fulfillment out of your blog. I bet that’s a really good feeling to have. Especially when you find someone new to connect with!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I blog because I enjoy the process of creating, writing and publishing a post, and because the self-discipline that it requires of me adds structure to my life (being retired, I have plenty of time on my hands). It’s great when lots of people read and comment on something I’ve written, but even when they don’t I’ve still had the pleasure of putting the piece together. At least, that’s what I tell myself!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I can tell when I read your blog just what your motivation is behind sharing what you share. It truly seems like a passion and a labour of love for you, much like a digital scrap book for your memories… and for anyone who might luck out enough to find it along the way.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s so kind, and also very perceptive. Thank you. “Labour of love” is a good way of putting it. The thing about “love” is that it’s never an easy journey: there are plenty of wrong turns and bumps along the way, but despite these occasional discomforts that’s no excuse for staying at home! (Spot the extended metaphor, stretched to within an inch of its life!)
        Thank you for continuing to read and comment on my ramblings, thereby giving Old Man Platypus a warm glow 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  12. I experienced Blog Burnout at the end of December. I didn’t like the material I was providing, and I felt my tone was whiney/negative. I took 2 months off to sprt moving to a new country and remember why I got into writing in the first place: to tell stories and keep friends around the world updated. I slowly got back into the grove after a few weeks of being in New Zealand. For me I felt the time off was necessary, as it became habit to write in a pessimistic tone, which I feel portrays me incorrectly as i’m overly optimistic in my day to day activities.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I remember reading about it on your blog back when I was trying to help you sort out your menu. Sometimes the pessimistic mood needs to take over though, so you can get it out and then move on and back to your optimistic self! And from what I’ve learned about you, you do seem like a very optimistic soul.

      Like

    1. Take your time, go slow and try to not do too much all at once! A lot of people try to take on everything at once and they quit within three months of starting there blog. If you want to stick around, implement slowly so you don’t feel the burnout!

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Awesome post! I definitely agree with people think blogging is easy. I actually burned out and stopped blogging. I would come back maybe once every month or two. Then my son came along in October and gave me literally a truck load of motivation and I haven’t lost it since.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Isn’t it funny how the unexpected things can bring us so much motivation to do, and say more? Sounds like your son brought a lot of motivation to your life!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. You make a lot of good points here my friend and you do it in a way that it’s like I the reader am having a regular conversation with you. So well organized and well written V😉
    A dear friend of mine who has been doing this for yrs gave me the most valueable piece of advice when I first started this blog thing that it takes time and patience to build an audience. I didn’t start this thing for any financial gain. I just had a desire to share my experiences, strength and hope surrounding my own path. In my humble opinion it’s best to get your intentions straight from the beginning. As always, great post V…keep writing😉❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you! Also, welcome to the blogging world if you’re very new. I’m sure with time you’ll find your footing and your tribe! Hope you are safe and healthy where you are!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you! I have been blogging on and off but became ill during pregnancy and wasn’t able to write. I am back in the swing of things but I definitely can see a dip in my blog. Hope y’all are safe and healthy too!

        Like

  15. I’m kinda guilty w this. Huhuhu coz before I was like, okay start a blog then afterall I’m not in the mood to write some content. Now, I decided to focus more not just on my content but also to myself to have some dedication to write ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There is nothing wrong with going through blogging burnout, it’s just something that a lot of people try to avoid, something I’d love to help people avoid where possible. That being said, it sounds like you’ve got some motivation/dedication now, so that’s a bonus!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I used to have a quilting blog and dreaded writing in it! I’m finally blogging about what’s important to me and I find myself just talking as opposed to writing a perfect post! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Authenticity is so important in what you’re sharing. Too many people think they have to select one niche and only talk about that thing. I’m sure you like quilting, but I’m sure there’s so much more to you than just quilting. Sharing your heart, your soul and your passions, quilting and beyond, is what’s going to bring you the most fulfillment! I’m so glad to hear you’ve expanded your repertoire!!

      Like

  17. In my last blog post I bitched about how much I apparently hate myself, but once again I’ve kept up blogging with relatively low success for about three years and I guess that’s something to be proud of. I don’t seem to hold any of these high misconceptions that might cripple some people.

    It is crappy to see a few bloggers that have real potential seemingly drop off the face of the earth. It’s especially frustrating to see happening in real time. One person I followed who has serious potential doesn’t seem to post anymore and it’s disheartening. I wish I could somehow teleport through the internet, slap them, and yell, “Keep writing for God’s sake, you’re good at it!”

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I feel like I get burnt out on my blog every few months. I’ll have a few solid weeks of committing to a schedule and engaging with others, and then I look at my stats and find a month or two of dedication had very little effect. I take a step back whenever it feels too much like shouting into a void and no one is listening, then get back to it when I remember no one’s going to read if I don’t get back to writing.

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  19. I had writers block. I also felt incredibly uninspired over the last year. I am one of those bloggers who quit and now I’m back. I love writing but I hit a wall in life for awhile. Writing is the one thing that makes me happy so… hopefully I keep feeling Inspired

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  20. I don’t work at my blog as much as I should, as I just do what is possible for me. I have decided to keep at it. I write because I have something to say. My reach is small, but my poems have had a positive impact on a few readers and I have decided to be happy with that.

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