Canadian cliches

I’ve been speaking with a potential client for a few days this week and he keeps asking me about Canadian cliches… except not about the realistic cliches, about the stupid/silly ones. The problem is, I’m sensing that he really has no idea and he might actually think that we own polar bears as pets. He keeps implying that polar bears are as common as cats and dogs in Canada. He also definitely thinks we eat beaver tails. He also thinks that all Canadians know one another. When I told him there are 37 million people in Canada his response was ‘Holy shit, where you all been hiding all these years?’

He seems like he’s lead an incredibly sheltered life. He was born and raised and has never left where he’s living now, not even for a holiday (from what he tells me). Which, hey… some people lead simple lives and don’t desire globetrotting, I can understand that much. I just… as someone who’s always been curious for information, find it hard to comprehend someone reaching their forties and never asking or trying to learn. I guess it wasn’t a priority to him. He learned what he needed too and left what he didn’t. lol

I just… I always assumed that it was mockery when people made fun of Canadian’s for stupid cliches. It never dawned on me that people might actually believe them. Perhaps that’s my bad. He seems to like his sheltered bubble, so I don’t want to burst it at this stage of his life. On the other hand…?

52 thoughts on “Canadian cliches

    1. This is true. If people can still believe the earth is flat, I guess it’s safe to say people genuinely believe we chop the tails off of beavers to eat as a Canadian delicacy.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Luckily, for him, you perfectly embody the “Nice Canadian” stereotype.
    Plus, why is he sounding amazed that CA has so many (37M) people when the lower CA – which I assume is much closer to home for him – has, what…42M? 47M? Suggesting 37M people spread over an area probably 30x the size of California seems small to me. But what do I know? 😂🤓🤦🏽

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Go on, burst it for him. He’s only 40…he can still have a life! People need to know for God’s sake!….never could understand not wanting to acquire as much as possible about the outside world.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. It’s a weird perspective, but I guess there are some people out there who genuinely don’t seek knowledge. There are some people in this world who genuinely just want to live without knowing.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It really is the same with a lot of things. For instance, how many people see technology as anything but magic? It blows my mind to imagine how the world would seem if I couldn’t comprehend the principles behind technology, as one example. But I’ve done a physics degree, and I remember this feeling of eternal confusion at how anything can possibly work. Biology, chemistry, physics, technology, engineering— all potential areas which would appear as pure magic without deliberate curiosity about them.

        Personally I can’t go for long with wondering about these things before I learn about them, especially with how incredibly easy it is today. But to aim to understand Everything (at least the basic principles) is quite unreasonable really lol (and surely not that common), so there’s always going to be this potential to be mindblown that someone can leave a particular subject as a mystery haha. But yeah there are degrees, and this guy’s point on the spectrum is quite rare lol.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. There are 2 subjects which I can’t crack the feeling of ‘magic’ about though— microbiology and quantum physics! I know for a fact that the workings of biology will always feel more magical than rational, no matter how much I learn! It’s like the complexity of biology is as overwhelming as the size of the universe.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. People say the same about Norway, that polar bears wander the streets, and that we’re all super good at skiing XD
    I was never taught how to ski, and polar bears can only be found on Svalbard, a territory far north of the mainland.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. My brother lives in Denmark and pre-pandemic he spent all of his holidays in Norway. He loves it. He’s told me a lot about it. When I think of Denmark I don’t think if skiiers, I just think of scenery. Lots of scenery, everywhere you look!

      I’ve recently found a YouTube channel of a woman documenting her life on Svalbard and she shares polar bears. Mind you, this guy has led such a sheltered life, he probably wouldn’t know what Svalbard is or how to find it on a map!

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Maybe he will now want to see Canada, if you assure him he won’t have to eat beaver tails… I wonder how anyone could think that you can have a polar bear as pet, though.
    As a child, I thought that Canada was some province in Quebec because I grew up in France and French people have a very strong connection with Quebec. I heard about Quebec more than about any other place in Canada and thought therefore that Quebec was the whole country.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. We also heard of the Quebec ties to France. The connection runs deep, from what I’ve been explained. Though, I am not from Quebec so I can’t speak anything more than speculation!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I was about to ask why is Maple syrup so expensive, but I’ve found my answer:

        “It takes 30-50 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup — an amount of sap that can take a single mature maple tree and entire sugaring season to produce! That’s right; it takes a lot of time and a huge amount of hard work to make any amount of maple syrup. From tapping the thousands of trees, installing and maintaining the miles and miles and miles of tubing that brings the sap from the trees to the “sugar shack” where it can be boiled”

        My mind is blown at the thought of all of this, just to produce maple syrup! And how on Earth did anybody discover that this was a good idea to begin with? So many questions, I have to find a documentary 😆.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. There are some crazy Australian cliches out there. I’ve taken part in joking about them from time to time in my life, but at least when I do it I take the opportunity to acknowledge they’re not true! I can only bet as to how crazy they get when people don’t do that, though.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Didn’t he asked if canadians own iglooes as holiday accommodations? Beside the joke, cliché seem to be everywhere, like the american ranches, where people are supposed to wear boots and cowboy hats everyday, or british people, who are imagined with the tea in one hand and a beer in the other hand. Even here in Italy there are cliché, almost always made by cities hating each other. And not forget that south of Italy is said to be based on summer tourism, and then in some ways it disappears during winter, or hibernates.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oh, I know that cliches are everywhere. Though I’m naive enough to believe that everyone understands they’re just cliches. Finding someone who really thinks we own pet-polar bears was crazy to me. Usually it’s only spoken in joke formation. He has mentioned igloos in our chats, though.

      Italian cliches we talk about in Canada is that all Italians eat pasta every day, and that all Italians make their pasta from scratch, every day. Oh and that every home has at least three generations living in it. And that Italians have the worlds best cheese! hahaha I don’t know too much about regional cliches, I reckon that might more local to Italians, Europeans knowledge or frequent visitors?

      Liked by 2 people

  6. I will admit that I’ve been fascinated with Canada (and Canadians) since I was young. Not to say that I’m “exoticizing” or stereotyping the residents as a certain way, but I find it so interesting that we (i.e. the US/Americans) share the same continent, yet know so little about our northern neighbors. Really goes to show just how egocentric we are with our country that we don’t know much about others elsewhere. Love you guys, though! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I love you too!
      haha
      I think it’s the education system. Every child in this country learns about the USA and it’s relationship with Canada from like… second grade.
      I don’t feel like that happens in the United States. I could be way off. Perhaps the American school system teaches about Canada and people just largely don’t listen. lol Either way, it makes for some bizarre conversations!

      For the record, if you ever make it here to visit, I will take you for Beaver Tail (which for the record is a pastry, not an actual beaver’s tail! lol)

      Liked by 2 people

      1. NO! We have bear claws too. Or.. had. They used to be really popular. Not so much anymore. Beaver tail is like a cinnamon bun/roll on steroids.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I had to Google it, and they look similar to lángos, which is a Hungarian fried dough pastry (albeit savory). I can imagine Beaver Tails are perfect for a snack, especially on a cold winter’s day!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s much warmer today than it has been the past week. The past seven days it’s been between -20 and -40 degrees celsius. Today it’s hovering around -10 degrees celsius.

      Liked by 1 person

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