Thoughts of the day

Disclaimer – I’m leaving comments open because I believe in open conversations about topics that can be/are deemed controversial topics. If you’re an asshole in the comments, I will turn them off.

In my opinion, it’s not the job of the general public to understand, or try to protect, anti-vaxxers.

In my opinion, a vaccine passport for COVID is not a violation of privacy. Similar documentation has been required for travel for decades. There’s never been mass hysteria against those requirements. Frankly, if someone doesn’t want the COVID vaccine, then they should get comfortable in the country they’re in. Viral contagions travel when people travel. That’s why we’re in this pandemic in the first place…

In my opinion, if you’re questioning the efficacy of the vaccine, you should ask a doctor, about your specific case (or your family’s). Whether you do virtual health meetings with a physician, or go in person, if you’re questioning the efficacy of the vaccine, a health care professional is the best person to get your advice from. There’s too much misinformation on the internet.

I would like to get the vaccine. I’m looking forward to becoming eligible. I’m looking forward to getting it.

The COVID Vaccine is not required in Canada. That being said, I reckon we could probably put our society in a lot better of a position if the majority of people did/do go and get the vaccine. This diatribe that the government is infringing on the rights of the public by recommending as many people as possible get the vaccine to create a societal immunity is really painful. No one is being forcibly confined and injected with a vaccination.

If someone doesn’t want to get the vaccine, then they won’t get the vaccine. I’m not here to change minds. I will say, though, if someone doesn’t want to get the vaccine, they don’t deserve to cry foul when countries begin implementing COVID vaccination requirements. It is coming. We know vaccination requirements are coming. It’s not a question of if, it is a question of when. Anyone who doesn’t want the COVID vaccination is an increased risk when travelling. There are going to be countries that do not want to accept that risk once a vaccination has been made more widely available. Travel restrictions aren’t just a thing of the present, they will be a thing of the future. Anyone who doesn’t believe that is fooling themselves.

I hope, I really do hope, that enough people choose to get the vaccine to give my local area, and the world, some level of immunity from this virus. We’re all tired of this virus. And I am just all to exhausted of hearing about government infringement on people’s rights through making vaccinations available. Vaccinations are a good thing. Throughout history it’s been proven time and again that vaccinations have quite literally saved us from horrible disease. There’s a reason why no one’s needed to worry about Polio in the Western World for several decades and it’s not wishful thinking.

Okay, I’m done now. I think.

71 thoughts on “Thoughts of the day

  1. Completely agree with you V, disabled people have been having to provide verification for their disabilities for all aspects of living our lives, for decades. I’ve got my second dose next Saturday, i hope you get yours soon 🙂

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    1. You raise a valid comparison that likely people won’t/don’t think about. I know I didn’t until I read your comment, but it’s true. Whether a disability is something someone can see immediately, or it’s a disability that isn’t visible to the eye, disabled people are required to ‘prove themselves’ (for lack of better terminology) when it comes to most aspects of life.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I can’t wait to get vaccinated. I remember getting excited reading your blog post about getting the vaccine. I can’t wait to do the same.

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  2. Just had the same conversation this morning. When I was a kid I was taken to SE Asia and was required to have typhoid/tetanus/cholera/smallpox vaccines . Without that little yellow booklet, you did not travel. Back then getting those shots was painful…needles like what granny used to darn socks. I was once sent off without that little yellow booklet and somehow was allowed to board a flight but when I arrived at destination (on Christmas Day) I had to have the same jabs I had already had 2 weeks prior. That’s how it was. No one got hysterical. It was the sensible thing to do. I don’t understand why so many people think their freedom is under threat. If they lived in Myanmar, maybe. Not here, not in Canada. I hope you get your vaccine soon. There is supposedly a new and better one, maybe you will get that.

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    1. Your story brings back memories of stories I’ve heard too many times before. Vaccines have been required for travel for so many decades, I don’t understand why people are crying foul about COVID. This is literally the worst pandemic in 100 years and now is the time we’re going to stop following the guidance of modern medicine and all that it’s done for us? It makes no sense.

      As for needles that are like grannys darning needles, that sounds scary as heck!

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  3. Respectfully disagreeing with you – if you are vaccinated you can still transmit the disease to others, the only difference being your chances of getting a fatal dose of covid becomes less. It is not as if you stop being able to transmit it. Then why insist people who make their choice not to vaccinate, or who can’t have the vaccination do not participate in society as they see fit, as long as they are properly masked? It just seems like superiority and churlishness. I have spoken to medical professionals, I decided considering my age and my history is extreme food allergies that need epipens, plus my autoimmune disease, that the vaccine is more dangerous to me than covid. It’s my choice. My choice, while I am masked up is of no greater danger than any vaccinated spreader. This is still a free country, and as long as non vaccinated rights don’t impinge upon the vaccinated, what is the issue?

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    1. I read this shortly after you wrote it this afternoon and I’ve been mulling it over for a few hours because I wanted to both give it proper thought, and I also didn’t want it to sound like I was arguing with you, because that’s definitely not the case.

      Firstly, I’m on the same page as you are with respect to medical conditions and reasonings being that which can stop people from getting the vaccine.

      With respect to the rest of your comment, I’m actually quite confused.

      The purpose of a vaccine is to reduce the severity of a disease/virus when you get it. This way, if someone does get COVID after getting the vaccine, they’re not hospitalized and they do not die from it. An added bonus being that if enough people get the vaccine, transmission can diminish vastly, because people have the antibodies to fight it.

      When you say ” My choice, while I am masked up is of no greater danger than any vaccinated spreader”, that’s not entirely true, because the goal of a vaccine is not to eliminate transmission, the goal is to give people the antibodies to reduce the severity of the disease and not completely thrust the health care system into a state of disrepair. A vaccinated person spreading to a vaccinated person is a lot less danger because both people will have the antibodies to help fight the virus. And vaccinated person spreading to a non-vaccinated person, however, is considerably more dangerous. Now, if enough people get vaccinated and build up those antibodies, transmission will dwindle to the extent that someone with the vaccine spreading it to someone without will happen at far less percentages then happening now.

      With respect to it being your choice, I never suggested that you shouldn’t get a choice. I was just suggesting that it’s well within a country’s rights to say ‘If you don’t have a vaccine you can’t travel here’. People have to get vaccinations for varying viruses and diseases when travelling to Asia, Africa, South American and even some places in central America and in the three decades I’ve been alive I’ve never seen mass hysteria about that. But, now that COVID is in the picture it’s become a contentious issue. Before, if people weren’t vaccinated, they wouldn’t go to those places. Now that COVID passports could be a reality, people are revolting. I was simply trying to suggest that a COVID vaccination should be treated on the same scale as Typhoid, Rhubella, Yellow Fever and all the other diseases you’re required to get vaccines for when travelling. The anti-vaccination movement never took mass issue with these travel restrictions before, so what’s different about COVID?

      I guess I am rambling at this point. So, to finish, I just wanted to say that I appreciated your comment and your willingness to share your disagreements with me.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I appreciate the response, and am not trying to fight. I am happy to understand where you are coming from, but all I see is more restrictions on personal freedoms. I am sorry I misread – I thought you were suggesting covid passports within the United States, shutting the unvaccinated out of shops, events and day to day life. I didn’t realize you were talking about international travel only.

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      2. Yeah, I largely meant for international travel. But to your point of passports at home, I think that kind of stuff will largely depend on the government in place. Here in the western world I don’t think we’ll see anything to the extent that places like those in the middle East will see, for example.

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      3. I guess if they do that domestically, I just won’t get to eat. There is no way I am being forced to put something into my body which could hurt me, There is absolutely no way I will comply.

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      4. I don’t think we’d see it here in the Western World. I could be wrong, and feel free to tell me off if it does end up happening. I’ll eat that crow.

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      5. …apologies for the disjointed reply – what business is it of anybody else if someone has chosen not to vaccinate themselves, if the vaccine doesn’t reduce transmission to others, and everyone has been offered the chance to vaccinate if they wish. Masks are a non invasive way to drastically reduce transmission, and I have been masking up since well before it was required, but I am not going to be forced out of society because I don’t trust a jab not to make me seriously unwell, especially considering the astro zeneca has question marks already, over its safety regarding blod clotting issues!

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    2. Covid vaccines definitely do reduce transmission. There was never any reason to expect otherwise especially because it’s an airborne virus. It would’ve been a surprise if it didn’t.

      For example:
      “Because vaccinations do dramatically reduce transmission, eventually the CDC will issue new (masking) recommendations for vaccinated individuals,”
      https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2021/04/03/covid-vaccines-reduce-transmission-but-still-wear-mask-experts-say/4833945001/

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      1. I think enough people do choose to (select to) get the vaccine, transmission can become low enough that people who haven’t gotten it because of religious or medical reasons will be in a much safer place. I think if not enough people choose to get the vaccine, we’ll continue to play this stop-gap of trying to protect people for decades to come. I guess that’s the basis of this immunity the scientists are speaking of. What that magic percentage of the population is, we’ll soon find out (based off what happens with the rest of this year!)

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    1. That’ll be interesting if you get to decide. I haven’t heard of many people getting to decide. I’ve just heard people get what they get? My coworkers in Texas got theirs already and they said they drove up, the people there told them what was being administered that day (based on supply). Do you get a choice where you are?

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      1. Apparently so. They do walkins for both where I’m at or an apt and yeah depending on the day I guess you get what they’re giving essentially. Idk for sure but I am going to tomorrow so I will let you know on that front!

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      2. Yes, please update me/us. I like hearing stories. I know everyone’s experience is different – but if you’re willing to share, then please do. Thank you!

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  4. I totally agree with you V! Vaccinations are part of life. To enroll little Johnny into Kindergarten you must prove that he has be vaccinated for all of the required vaccinations. If he has not had them he will not be able to start school.
    There are many restrictions when entering a country when it comes to communicable diseases. Things like Tuberculosis and even HIV are things that may not allow you into America.

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    1. They’ve since done away with those requirements for vaccinations in schools in Alberta. I think it’s a province to province thing, now. But I do remember having to be vaccinated when I went to school in BC. Also, go point about restrictions of entry with things like TB and HIV. It’s something I don’t think a lot of people (especially Americans) are even aware of.

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  5. I haven’t been vaccinated yet and not sure how to go about getting it. For a while I was unsure as to whether or not it’s safe while pregnant but was told that it will give the babe some immunity too. It’s not clear cut as to how we are supposed to apply for the vaccine but I will be doing more research.

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    1. As a pregnant lady, you’re eligible in this Phase 2B Rollout. Check with your doc! One of the girls I work with is pregnant and her doctor set everything up for her here in the city. I think she’s getting hers on Friday or Saturday. The doc will also tell you which one is better for you and and the baby.

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      1. I don’t have a family doctor but I go to EFW (high risk) clinic for checkups. Last time they gave me some info about getting vaccinated. I will try to set up an appointment through them. I also deal with AHS but they haven’t sent out any recent emails regarding vaccines. Thanks for the suggestions, V 🙂

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      2. Good Luck! Keep me posted as to how it goes. I know I suck at texting back some times. Sometimes I think I’ve texted you back and then when I look at my texts three days later I realize I typed it and never hit send, so then I don’t hit send because I’m worried I’m going to look like an asshole. lol. Like, I definitely responded to your Angelica’s mom tweet. That’s unrelated, though.

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  6. I can only speak for the UK, as someone said above, getting the vaccine doesn’t stop you transmitting it, it just lowers the chances of you getting it bad, in the world, the only virus to have stopped full stop is smallpox. We still have variants of everything else including the black death, which is also found in the US.

    I strongly object to the passport, not for travel, I think that should be down to individual countries, as, again someone else has said and you, yourself said certain places require vaccinations for other things, why not this? But I object to it being bought into places like pubs and resturants. I am on the fence about large sporting events and concerts, especially if they open during the summer this year.

    In the UK we have gone from this will only be for 3 weeks, to we will lift restrictions when the vulnerable are vaccinated, to when the over 50’s are vaccinated, to when 90% of the population is vaccinated to when 50% of the world is vaccinated, it just goes on, so I am not surprised when people (in the UK) are now starting to moan about the goal posts being moved.

    I also think that our government need to think about how people get to the vaccination centers, for me my nearest one is 22 miles away as the crow flies, not so bad in a car , without a car its 2 bus, a train and a walk. I live next to one of the largest hospitals in the area. I am not even going to go into the fact that me leaving my flat is a near miracle on some days.

    Bring them in for travel if countries want them, but don’t bring them in for going to the pub.

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    1. While vaccines don’t stop transmission, they can limit transmission if enough people are vaccinated, yes? I agree the goal isn’t to eliminate the disease because I think with modern medicine we’re all aware eliminating COVID is highly unlikely given it’s spread.

      Travel – Yes. If you don’t have a vaccine, you’re more of a liability to the country’s population when you get there. You could get it from someone and spread it to twenty people before you leave. You could bring it in, not knowingly, and spread it to twenty people before you leave. You could have it while there and require hospitalization, extensive medical support, possibly in some cases a medivac flight home depending on where in the world you are, all of which make someone a huge liability to the country they’re travelling to if they’re not vaccinating.

      At home in one’s own country – a pub is a privately owned business. So I guess the question there becomes… why is it overreaching for the government to tell private citizens to get vaccinated, but not overreaching for the government to make it illegal for a private business to ask if someone is vaccinated? Not me trying to be sassy, or to argue, I’m just generally wondering where the line is of what’s acceptable and what’s not. Does that make sense?

      I get that in the UK you’re mighty tired of the back and forth. We’ve had very similar experiences here in my province in Canada and I’m tired of it as well. But I also think that the moving goal posts are keeping people alive. It’s all in how countries, and their citizens, have handled things. In New Zealand life has been… mostly normal… for months now. In the United States they’re taking prisoners out of prisons to carry dead bodies out of hospitals to refrigerated trucks where they’re sitting because morgues and funeral homes are so damn full, there’s nowhere to put remains.

      I do think the more people who get the vaccine the better off we’ll be able to be in the long run. I don’t think this vaccine will eradicate the disease. But, it can help prevent a lot of unnecessary death.

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      1. There is not enough evidence to suggest it limits transmission, research is still ongoing, the last thing I saw, was that while it looks like it does, those who were infected with it while having had the vaccine, 66% were now asymptomatic, but I don’t remember seeing if they had a figure for how many spread it.

        Everyone always picks on New Zealand as the go to country. It is roughly the same size as the UK but with 60 million less people. They have managed to stop transmission by basically stopping anyone coming in and out, for islands that is a way of doing it (and should have been done in the UK) but for everywhere else it couldn’t happen.

        I think part of the problem I have is that the vaccine doesn’t stop me spreading it, yet I might be forced to take it to protect me from a virus which has virtually no chance of killing me, how does that make sense? I dislike compaing it to the flu, but its the only other vaccine which comes to mind, where the vulnerable get a booster year after year and one of our leading scienctists has said in years to come this is probably going to become our flu and have to boosters and such like year after year.

        I agree business can put their own rules in place, but by insisting that you have a covid vaccine to be able to come in, is going to finish off a number of them, especially with the news of blood clots (I haven’t read into this, but I saw somewhere they are increasing but still very low number compared to the amount of vaccine given) I think the number given is 30% of all pubs are not going to reopen now and they were a struggling business before this.

        I am not an antivaxxer but I really don’t agree with it being implimented within our own country for our own citizens, I think it is starting to go down a very dangerous route. Infact a few years ago something very similar was suggested in the UK similar to what they are suggesting now and was shotdown on sight. Now with Covid they have bought in back under a different name and people are accepting it.

        When living with a government who has cabinet ministers who have outright said things such like children of single mothers as “ill-raised, ignorant, aggressive and illegitimate”. Completely against abortion even in cases of rape and incest. Who have been fired for things such as leaking secrets, sceret meetings with different governments and are now back in power, they could tell me the sky was blue and I wouldn’t believe them.

        I would also say that my view might be alot different if I did travel, go to big events etc and maybe in a few years that might be my position but I would argue its because I wanted to go to XYZ country, not because I wanted a very expensive pint at my local

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      2. When I spoke of reducing transmission, I meant vaccines as a whole. Because there might not be enough evidence right now for a COVID vaccine specifically (as it’s so new to the market), there are known statistics from other vaccines for decades to show that when people get them, transmission slows considerably.

        Where you say “yet I might be forced to take it to protect me from a virus which has virtually no chance of killing me,” are you actually being forced? Because that’s a different story. If someone is forcibly sitting you in a chair, holding you down and jabbing your arm, that’s a whole different scenario. I’ve never advocated for forcible immunization. I’ve advocated that as many people as possible should be getting it, but I’ve never suggested that it should be forcible. I would never want it to be forcible.

        Also, I’d suggest your comparison to the flu vaccine is speculative at this point in time. If enough people don’t get the vaccine, the speculation that this could become a yearly shot is more likely to become true, sure. I guess that depends on how the world reacts.

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  7. Nearly 3 million people have died. It’s shut down economies and normal lives. Yay for the countries that say “You’re free to do what you want, but if you aren’t a citizen you aren’t coming to infect our people. You’re not welcome here if you haven’t tried to protect those around you.” I’m ready to travel again and want to protect myself and others. I’m trusting the scientists. If I die from the vaccine, at least it was with pure motives. (I don’t expect to die – after one shot, I’m doing well.)

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  8. I am not an anti-vaxer by any means and I have no problem with anyone that wants to get the vaccine because everyone in entitled to make a choice as to what to do with their bodies. However, I have heard some serious horror stories from people I know and trust that have had serious reactions to the second dose of the vaccine and that is why I’m choosing not to get it for now. I don’t really travel so I don’t see it as such a big deal and I don’t think asking for a vaccine passport if you’re going to be traveling is a bad thing. Like someone already said, if you were to travel to another foreign country, you may need a vaccine to safely travel there. But the difference between those and the current shot is it has not been studied long enough (or been around long enough) to see what the long term side effects are going to be. Astra Zeneca’s vaccine may be getting pulled altogether due to blood clots forming from the vaccine or so I heard on the news. I’m always that 1% when it comes to major side effects so I feel safer not taking it but I totally respect your side of it as well. Still love you smart, beautiful, caring woman!! ❤

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    1. I’ve only heard of minor side effects from the second shot so far. Maybe that’s a good thing, to keep me from getting anxious about it. The people I know who’ve had their second shot are telling me they’re getting the chills, a fever, general side effects to be expected of a vaccine. That being said, if you know someone who’s had a really bad side effect form it, that sucks! I am sorry for them. Hopefully they deemed it worth while to now have the antibodies
      If you’re not getting the second shot, that’s entirely your choice to do so. Everyone has a choice, right? Like I mentioned, no one is forcibly confining people here in Canada to inject them.
      For me, it’s about big picture. People keep talking about getting back to life as normal, but, if those who are anti-vaxxers are relying on everyone else to get a vaccine so life can go back to normal, what if there’s not enough people to create some sort of an immunity, or to limit transmission? What if… that never happens? They broke down population demographics in my province, and with the fact that the vaccine isn’t recommended for people under 16, it’s said more than 8o percent of our adult population in the province would need to get the vaccine to create some sort of an immunity and limit community transmission. What if only 50 or 60 percent decide to get it? Does that mean this hamsters wheel keeps spinning? Anyways, I’m talking out loud right now. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me, I really appreciate it. And I appreciate the kindness in sharing your thoughts with me. I know it can be a topic that people get up in arms about sometimes. So far in these comments people have been really kind, which is so nice.

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  9. I think a literal “COVID vaccine passport” is kind of ridiculous, because it does show which countries have the privilege to have the vaccines and others which cannot afford to yet. But I do agree with you that if people choose not to get the vaccine (due to personal or religious reasons), we aren’t to judge them. I’ve already received my first dose and will get my second in a couple of weeks, and my rationale is not only to develop immunity/alleviate symptoms if I get COVID, but also as a service to the community to *hopefully* bring down cases, especially after the mess the US has gone through the past year. And if it’s required for travel, then more power to it!

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    1. I think, with time and COVAX, countries in SE Asia and Africa that cannot afford them will get them. And, I would be that even before they do manage to get enough doses for their populations, they’ll likely have some sort of restrictions in place to ensure people coming in are vaccinated, because at least if people who are coming in are vaccinated, they’ll be less likely to wind up in hospital putting added stress on their health care systems. If that makes sense?

      I don’t judge people for not getting a vaccine. I just think that if someone willingly chooses to not get a vaccine, they shouldn’t be able to cry foul when these travel restrictions stay in place, or are amped up as vaccines are more widely available. Sept 11 changed how we travelled thereafter and I think COVID has, and will forever change the way travel happens. Does that make sense?

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  10. Vee you, like most of the world, is talking about Covid vaccine only. There are many around the world, percentage is very low though, who don’t believe in any vaccine.

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  11. I agree and I disagree… haha! I think everyone should be free to decide if they want to get the vaccine or not. I also agree that countries should be allowed to say you can’t travel to their country if you don’t have it (I had to have a yellow fever vaccine before I could go to several African nations). I cry foul when the vaccine is required to do normal every day things in life in your own country. New York is trying to make the vaccine required to eat in restaurants, go to concerts, fly in a plane, *maybe* even going in grocery stores. There are many reasons people don’t get vaccines (allergic reactions, compromised immune systems, religious beliefs), these people will be barred from participating in pretty basic aspects of life if the vaccine “passport” is instituted. I have a real problem with these kinds of decisions.

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      1. You don’t think there’d be medical and religious exemptions for this, like there are in most other aspects of life? I feel like with how progressive the world has gotten the past decade, now more than ever there’d be exemptions. My sister-in-law was required to get her kids vaccination for measles and whooping cough and a couple of other things for them to be eligible for public elementary school where they live. Is that coercion? (That’s not me arguing or trying to be sassy, that’s just me asking your take one a similar, but different scenario) FTR, My sister-in-law’s best friend has a child with severe illness and that child was offered medical exemption. I don’t know, maybe it depends on where you live and who your government is, how open and progressive they’d be on the matter.

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  12. I’ve no idea what’s going on here, but I also don’t pay much attention to the news, so… yay! Got my first dose the other day, though. I hope you can get yours soon!

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  13. I think vaccines are important. I think people are free to choose. I think there are valid reasons not to be vaccinated if the side effect of vaccine is too much for some. Like the Oxford vaccine. I have had my first shot and so has most of my family and it was the AZ Oxford vaccine. But I am nervous now because of what we are learning about blood clots linked to the AZ vaccine. In the UK we can’t pick which vaccine we get. We get told speak to our GP, but they can’t help.

    I think if the vaccine is safe, and the side effects don’t impact us then go for it. I think vaccines may be the only way out if this. And I wish people would see the bigger picture. Otherwise we keep going in lock down, and then the economy will be in even worse state, that …well I just don’t know. There are people who still don’t believe in covid and take it so lightly.

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    1. There are a lot of people in my province who still do not believe COVID is real. They hold weekly rallies, by the thousands, to ‘prove’ that there’s nothing real about it. It’s crazy.

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  14. I totally agree, it’s not an infringement. In fact, I think those who choose not to get it and go about their travels is infringing upon the general public’s right to travel and live safely. They are putting others around them at risk. And fine, religion /own beliefs, I get it but you gotta know you’re going to be limited in what you can and can’t participate in… 🤷‍♀️

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    1. Yeah, I think that’s the pandemic effect. People who choose to not get the vaccine will have to deal with the after-effect of how the world operates now that COVID 19 is a reality.

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  15. I support vaccine passports, in particular not for overseas travel. Other countries are perfectly reasonable and well within their rights to set entry requirements for people coming from abroad, this includes protecting the country they are visiting from communicable diseases.

    When my family lived abroad and travelled when I was younger, we all had to have the yellow fever vaccination and to be able to evidence we had received it to be able to enter several countries we visited. So we all got vaccinated before leaving Norway, and it was all entered and stamped into a little yellow booklet we were all given, issued by the WHO.

    I am unsure how they would go about making a vaccine passport mandatory as such, people can have the right to not have one. However, what they are doing to themselves, is limiting their choices and what they can do and where they can go.

    Sure, you can have choices – but people who say no should understand, that those choices have consequences.

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    1. “Sure, you can have choices – but people who say no should understand, that those choices have consequences.” – Summed up my entire post a lot better than I did. Thank you.

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  16. 1) With the exception of the U.S-Mexico border everyone seems to pretty much agree these days that nations should have sovereign control over their own borders. I think the issue that people are more concerned about are requirements to show proof of vaccination to enter businesses or events. I think that’s an entirely different issue. 2) Privacy is by definition personal. If an individual feels that a certain action violates their privacy it’s not really your place to argue with them.

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    1. 2) At face value, I agree with the statement. Also, though, people are entitled to their own opinions. So, I’m entitled to believe that it’s not a privacy issue, just as much as someone is entitled to believe that I am wrong. The world isn’t black and white… there are plenty of shades of grey. That’s literally the premise of the entire United States legal system.

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  17. I totally agree. I love that you have allowed for an open dialogue for your readers to discuss and share opinions (exercising democracy). With all of the latest resources and information available now versus what we didn’t know, it’s safe to say that individuals who decide not to engage in the vaccination process needn’t complain about any new protocols for public function moving forward. You either get it or you don’t: simple.

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    1. I value everyone’s opinions. I might not agree with them, and they might not agree with me. But, we’re all entitled to opinions. And, we can be respectful and polite about it. This comment section is proof of that. I like hearing what people have to say about the matter. And, like you say ‘you either get it or you don’t. Simple as that’.

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  18. This hits on something I’ve been thinking about for the past year or so and I think I’ve commented on it before on your posts: certain people are willing to take action for the greater good and others are either selfish or blind and refuse to act.

    I got a single-shot vaccine last week and felt like hell for three days but I was fine with it because I took solace in knowing I did the right thing. I took an action thinking it’d help society in general and this more than justified my feeling like death for three days. Like I’m thinking about the greater good for everyone at beating this thing while others are so damn opposed to it for reasons that I can’t comprehend. It just seems short sighted, selfish, and ignorant.

    I’d love to write a blog post about this someday. Why do some people do things for the greater good while others shrivel up and fear the smallest “personal freedom violation?” I don’t know why, and I don’t like the fact of it, it but it’s intriguing at least.

    Like

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