Just do it.

Today I learned of a woman who, when the pandemic hit Canada, started her own business that has now grown so large, she’s looking to hire employees to expand operations across Western Canada.

The business? Chickens.

She owns chickens. People can rent her chickens for $35 an hour to come to their home and eat the slugs and bugs out of their garden. It’s a pesticide free way of cleaning their gardens and yards. Chickens eat the pests. She takes her chickens to people’s yards, set them free for an hour or two, and makes $35 an hour to sit and watch them eat bugs.

The woman who owns the business says that she’s booked through mid-October and that she’s not booking much farther than that right now because we don’t know when it’ll snow around here. She also said that customers who rented her chickens this year are also pre-booking the service for next spring and summer as well.

If ever there was a story to remind you to just do it, this is it. If you’ve been thinking about starting a business, if you’ve been wondering if you can do it, do it.

A woman who keeps chickens as pets has been making $35 an hour through a pandemic by essentially taking her chickens on field trips. If she can do it, so can you. Start your business. Chase your passions. Fulfill your dreams. Work for yourself. Start your side-hustle now and watch it grow.

You owe it to yourself to do it. Stay within your means, but don’t limit your future. Use the chickens you keep as pets, and when things pick up, get more chickens!

My uncle’s funeral

I would like to start this post by saying that I didn’t want to travel. Traveling right now is not fun. It’s hard. It’s frustrating. It’s annoying.

If you’ve been around this blog for a while, you’ll know that I lost my uncle earlier this year. We actually learned of his death just three days before the province virtually shut down in precautionary COVID measures. Planning a funeral was seemingly impossible. Not only were there legal limits on how many people could be in one place at one time, but we also needed to think about the fact that my father, his siblings and most of their relatives (with exceptions of kids and grandkids) are 60 are older. Gathering in a large group seemed… not just stupid, but dangerous too.

COVID cases in Western Canada were trending downward for a while. Businesses started reopening and we reached a point that people were told groups of 50 or more could meet outside. Given the news warning we could be headed for a second lockdown, my aunt came up with a plan to host a funeral for my uncle now, before it got too late and we hit a second wave.

The plan was to meet at the beach. My aunt has a cabin at the lake and they have a pretty spacious beach. The rule was that only my uncle’s siblings, their spouses and their children were allowed to come. No grandkids, no cousins or other extended family, no former coworkers… no one was allowed to come who wasn’t immediately, and closely tied to my uncle. The details were strict and needed to be adhered to at all costs. Everyone had to wear masks. Everyone was provided pocket sized hand-sanitizer. Everyone had to stand/sit six feet or more apart.

I went and got an asymptomatic COVID test on Thursday, received my results on Friday morning and left. The only stop made along the way was to get gas and brownies in Lake Louise. (IYKYK) There were a lot of people in Lake Louise blatantly ignoring bylaws mandating that people wear masks. There were also A LOT of crowds. People didn’t seem to care about COVID.

When I got to the town the funeral was being held in, I immediately went to the hotel. Driving through the parking lot I saw a lot of American license plates, which was curious to me as the Canada/USA border is still closed to non-essential travel and this town is not even remotely close to any route to Alaska. When I got to the hotel lobby, I was met with a lot of people hanging out, laughing in the lobby without masks. Again, people didn’t seem to care about COVID. I’m not sure why as the particular area I was in was/has been averaging 100 cases per week. (100 cases might not seem like a lot compared to news we’re hearing about Brazil and the USA, but 100 for this little town and their small population is a very large number)

I nearly lost my cool at the elevator when a man with a southern accent pushed his way onto my elevator without a mask and then tried to intimidate me when I got out of the elevator. I wanted so badly to argue with him, but his lack of mask reminded me it might smarter for me to step out of the elevator and let an asshole be an asshole. The southern accent made me also think that he might be from one of the cars with American plates that I saw in the parking lot, and if he was traveling, I didn’t want to be near him.

For the most part, I stayed in my hotel room.

When I left the room I had a mask on. I had hand sanitizer with me and I have a little gadget on my keychain that makes it so I don’t have to push buttons or open doors with my fingers.

The next day I got up, got dressed and went to the funeral.

I was nice.

It was sad. But it was the farewell that my uncle deserved.

I’m certain that we looked entirely weird to anyone who saw us… all spaced out on a beach yelling at one another.

We laughed about my uncle’s dry sense of humour. We smiled and celebrated when we learned stories from his life of the goodness he spread. We cried when we talked about how tragic his passing was. We never got near one another. Though I’m sure everyone wanted to hug one another, everyone acted with precaution. I was proud of them all for that because, while the other people might not care what’s happening in this world, my family was able to successfully have a funeral for my uncle without anyone getting sick.

The funeral ended, I got in the car and I left. I stopped only to get gas, and I was home that night, shortly after midnight.

There were no hugs. There were no handshakes. There was no stopping to see sights. There was no going without a mask. Precautions were taken at every step of the way.

I was anxious for weeks about this funeral. I didn’t want to travel, but I wanted to be there for my uncle. I didn’t want to be around people, but I wanted to be there for my family.

My recommendation to anyone who has to travel, or is considering travel is to be careful. Don’t be stupid. Take precautions. You may be perfectly healthy, but all it takes is for you to cross paths with one sick person and everyone you cross paths with for the rest of that day and likely for weeks after, you could be spreading germs too. That’s how COVID spread around the world (literally) in a matter of three short months. If you don’t have to go somewhere, consider staying home. If you have to go somewhere, be very careful. Precautions help. Don’t hang out in crowds. Wear your mask. Bring sanitizer. Don’t give out hugs. Don’t attend a car show in Hamilton! Keep to yourself. Pretend you’re an introver!

The news is saying that it’s going to be a long, hard winter that’ll be made a lot worse if we don’t take precautionary measures to slow the spread of COVID. So please, please, please be careful.

RBG

The leading story on our local news tonight was that the Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died from complications due to her metastatic pancreas cancer.

I’m not an American but I know what she stood for and what she accomplished in her lifetime. She was a truly incredible woman who played a huge role in pushing the United States forward and she was a role model to so many.

She stood for morality, equality and she stood against discrimination. She was a voice of reason in a world clouded with what seems like everything but reason.

I truly believe she is someone the history books will favour. I mean… she was such a badass. I hope that her legacy is treated with the utmost respect, around the world, and most importantly, in the United States.

May she rest in peace.

Ugh.

If you do not like me, don’t read this blog. If you think I’m an idiot, don’t read this blog. If you disagree with me to a point that you don’t think we can have a civil conversation, don’t read this blog.

No one is being forced to read this blog. Yes, it is public. However, just because something is public does not mean that you have to read it.

I know that not everyone agrees with me. And that’s okay. I’m not here to make the world agree with me. I’m here to write my thoughts… on my blog. Emphasis on my blog. If you would like to share your thoughts in a respectful manner, open dialogue is welcome. FYI: it is possible to share differing opinions without being an asshole. That being said, if you’re going to be an asshole, your comments will be flagged as spam and you will be blocked.

I do not have the time, patience or desire to deal with keyboard warriors.

End of story.

Masks, Masks, Masks

Masks are cool. I am not just saying that because masks are mandatory in my city. I’m also not saying that because wearing a mask means that I no longer have to put makeup on the lower half of my face. I am saying it because it’s cool to be kind to strangers. It’s cool to do something just to be nice. It’s also cool to do your part to try and help slow a global pandemic.

I’ve accumulated quite a collection over the past few weeks, both purchased and made. All reusable. Reusable masks were important for me to get my hands on because, if you remember, I really don’t like single use products. I completely understand that in the middle of a global pandemic, a mask is better than no mask, and for that reason there is a place for disposable masks right now. That being said, it was both within my budget, my resources and my means to get reusable masks. So I did.

Initially I just purchase a set of three. I did so thinking that if I left them by the door of my house, they’d be easy to grab before I headed out for errands. But, as time has unfolded, I’ve learned that it makes my life a lot simpler if I just have a mask anywhere I might need one. Masks at the front door. Masks int he glove box. Masks in my purse. Masks in my office (in two weeks when it reopens). If there’s a mask anywhere that I could possibly need one, I’ll never find myself without or have to say ‘I forgot’. I also won’t have to purchase disposable masks.

I plan on keeping these grey ones at my office. They’re neutral, so if I need one whilst I am at work, it really won’t matter what I am wearing, they’ll match.

These masks inspired a desire to have tie dye in my life. As of right now they’re hanging by the door. You know, I’m coming around to the idea that a little colour can be a good thing!

I bought these masks solely from a vanity perspective. I have blue eyes and my thought was that if I have to wear something on my face that covers half of my face, I might as well get something that matches my eyeballs. That’s accessorizing!

These Canadian themed masks I actually didn’t know were coming my way. My mom made them as a present for me after the mask mandate came into effect in my city. You know, if we’re still wearing masks when the snow starts to fall, I reckon these will be mighty cute during the Canadian winter.

Steps onto Soap Box: Masks are a simple and easy way for people to show they respect their community and their neighbours. Masks are a simple and easy way to help stop/slow the spread of germs. Masks are a simple and easy way to be a good person.

What I’ve learned over the past month (since the mandate came into effect) is that masks aren’t always cheap. I’ve seen them priced anywhere from $3 each to $145 each. And frankly, in the middle of a global pandemic, when people are trying to do their part but also trying to watch their spending, ain’t nobody got time for $145 a mask.

I wanted to share some excellent, affordable mask options, for if you’re looking and don’t have a mom to sew masks for you.

  1. Old Navy – If you are in Canada, Old Navy sells masks in a package of five for $15. If you are in the United States, I believe they are $12.50 for a package of 5. While they are quality masks, Old Navy is a fast fashion brand and I cannot tell you where they are made, by whom, or how little said person might be (is likely) being paid.
  2. Province of Canada – Province of Canada is a Canadian brand that manufactures all of it’s products in Canada. The masks are quite a bit more pricey than the Old Navy masks, but if you have the budget for it, $14 for ethical manufacturing is a great option.
  3. Hanes – These face masks are the ones that ‘everyone and their dogs’ are using for tie-dye from home. Right now the website is selling a 10 pack for less than $30. I’ve ordered some to test my tie-dye abilities but they haven’t arrived yet.

Do you need a ton of face masks? Definitely not. My collection is quite large, and I know that. I do believe that it’s good to have one or two, though. Two is a good number because you should be washing them and if one is in the washing machine, you will still have one available. I also believe that you shouldn’t have to spend your oodles of money on a mask. They’re supposed to help and if they’re deeply impacting your bank account, that’s not helping.

And of course, if you don’t have access to any reusable masks whatsoever, buy the disposable ones. As much as I hate seeing them littered all over streets and sidewalks and getting wrapped around seagull wings right now, seeing them is a reminder that people are wearing them. And that is important. It’s important that we make it through this year and that we all be as kind to one another as possible. Everyone has to work together to slow the spread. Since the CDC, WHO and most governments in the world are recommending masks, masks are cool.

I’ll be wearing them for the foreseeable future.

Get yourself a mask or two. Look at it as something you’re doing for right now, not forever. Lead by example. Stay healthy. Stay safe. Slow the spread.


*My mom says she’ll sell them to whomever wants one. All they have to do is pay the price of postage.

Drama in the neighbourhood

I live in a private neighbourhood. It’s nothing like those gated neighbourhoods you see in the USA that have guards at the front or anything, but it’s definitely a secluded neighbourhood. There’s a big sign at the front that says ‘Private Property’ and another that says ‘Residents only beyond this point’.

This place is… as far as Canadian neighbourhoods go, very secure, so to speak. The common areas have cameras in them. Even the mailboxes have a camera pointed at them. I rent this place, so the landlord forwards messages on from the Home Owners Association and the messages lead me to believe that they literally have eyes in the back of their heads. Honestly, nothing happens here without them finding out. They know everything.

The past couple of days there’s one particular house in this neighbourhood that has had vehicles parked at it from California and Nevada. This is obviously curious due to the fact that the Canadian/US border has been closed to non-essential travel since March. Furthermore, travellers coming into the country legally are required to isolate for 14 days upon getting here, and these people definitely have not been quarantined.

Late last night some police cars showed up at their house. I’m not really surprised. With the fact that the HOA knows everything and sees everything around here, I reckon they probably reported these people.

Since I love drama so darn much I decided to sit out on the stoop and listen to all the drama unfolding a few houses down.

Okay, so there’s a few points to note here:

  • As of June 9th immediate family members are allowed into Canada to reunite with their family. This is not for leisurely travel, this is specific to reuniting with your family members that you have not seen due to the pandemic
  • There is a stipulation that if you are coming into the country you are quarantined for a minimum of 14 days upon entry into Canada. It’s a mandate from the federal government
  • If you are visiting immediate family, you are required to be in Canada for a minimum of 14 days before travelling again. This stipulation being place so that, if someone comes to Canada and is sick, they can give themselves the necessary time to hopefully recover before they travel elsewhere and spread the virus there as well

The police showed up to ask these people where they’re from, why they’re here and how long they’re staying. Given that they drove here, and that there’s been a large influx of American tourists using the ‘driving to Alaska’ excuse as a means to skirt the border policy and come to Canada for a holiday, it’s kind of just them doing their due diligence to make sure these people are legally allowed to be here and following the Canadian requirements to limit transmission of the virus.

What I learned from listening to the screaming they were doing at the police officers last night:

  1. One of them called each of the police officers a pussy for caving to government control and wearing a mask
  2. They themselves refused to wear a mask when speaking to (more like yelling at) the police officers and refused to stay several feet back when the police officers asked them to step back because they weren’t willing to wear a mask
  3. They weren’t willing to provide identification to the police officers or acknowledge their relationship to the homeowner
  4. They’re not willing to quarantine for 14 days because, and I quote ‘Your stupid fucking government is far overreaching their rights in telling people to do so’.
  5. They weren’t willing to tell the police how long they intend on being here.

For reference, all they’d really have to do is acknowledge their relationship to the homeowner and provide identification. If they’re here legally, there shouldn’t really be an issue, right? On the other hand, if they told the border guards they were driving to Alaska and have decided to stop off here for a week to shop and eat and holiday then they could be in trouble.

Neither vehicle is parked outside today.

I don’t know if that means that they left, abruptly, or if they’ve just parked their vehicles elsewhere? The vehicles have been parked for a solid week and they’ve been driving around with the homeowner (I’m assuming because the homeowner has local license plates).

Could they be here legally? Totally. Could they be here illegally? Absolutely. I don’t know what’s what with them. They could be visiting immediate family members and just choosing to act hella suspicious as a means to be assholes. That being said, even if they are here legally, they have not quarantined since being in that house and told the police the 14 day quarantine period was stupid and a gross overreach of the government.

Literally, all they had to do was show their identification and acknowledge their relationship to the homeowner. Screaming at police officers on the street at 11:30 at night that the police have no right to question them and need to mind their own damn business… it was a drama filled evening, that’s for sure.

Point of note: no one is singling out Americans here. Canadians are subject to disclosing their reasons for travel when they go from province to province. It’s being done as a measure to try and stop the spread of the virus. I disclosed why I was coming here when I moved here.

It looks like I robbed a bank!

After five months of putting it off, I have caved to the quarantine cliche of tie-dye. That’s right, I defied my stubbornness, bought fabric dye and made one hell of a mess.

I opted for blue, as it’s my favourite colour. I opted to not buy gloves because, again, I’m extremely stubborn. Initially the plan was to purchase the dye and give a little flare to my face masks. However, whilst I was at the store they had white t-shirts right next to the fabric dye (marketing on point) that were screaming my name. As a result, the plan changed.

Next week is my mom’s birthday and she happens to love all things 70’s fashion – bell bottoms, patches on everything, permed hair and especially tie-dye. So, when I bought the shirt, I thought I could turn it into something she might love, and then I could add it to her birthday present.

The plan, turn a boring white t-shirt into a crystal sea of blue tie-dye. I bought a big shirt so that if it turns out crappy, she can pretend that she likes it (like moms do) and wear it as pajamas.

It seemed easy enough:

  1. Crinkle Shirt.
  2. Put elastics around shirt to keep it crinkled
  3. Line sink with trash bag
  4. Put shirt in trash bag
  5. Cover shirt in dye
  6. Tie a knot in trash bag and leave it to sit for several hours
  7. Rinse shirt thoroughly and then put in washing machine
  8. Wash shirt in cold water
  9. Give to mom

What actually happened? I made a huge mess. Damn. did I ever make a mess. The bottle of dye dumped all over my counter (which if you’ve seen pictures of my counter it is a very light cream colour) and I had to wipe it up in a hurry because I also have wood floors and I did not want the dye to drip onto the floors too.

In the process of cleaning the spilled dye, all of my dish towels and one bath towel got covered in a sea of blue. The good news is that it came off the counter. The bad news? I didn’t buy gloves. My hands look like a dye-pack exploded all over them. Please say a prayer for me that there are no banks in this neighbourhood that are robbed in the next few days.

I may or may not also have dye on my nose and my ear. I’m just going to pretend that was intentional.

Everything is presently in the washing machine. After cleaning the dye off the counter, I did the shirt for my mom and had a tiny little bit left, so I dyed a white shirt of mine. As I type this there’s 32 minutes left on the washing machine. So I’ll have to update later as to how it turns out.

I have high hopes. But also, I don’t.

Almost done…

Okay, it’s been a few hours since I left this post. I have to admit, I really don’t love this. Considering the colour I bought was royal blue, I’m a little disappointed that I used so much dye and got only a pale blue and so much white. I’m not really sure if I even want to add this to the package for my mom.

What I did learn though is that different types of fabric soak up the dye differently. This second set of pictures is an old shirt of mine that I’ve had for several years. With this shirt I literally had less than a third of the dye left and just decided to try it to see what happened. I have to say, I like this one a lot better.

All that being said, I definitely can’t give a several year old shirt to my mom for her birthday. So, I will be keeping this one. I kind of dig it. It’s crazy that I only bought one colour of dye and there’s distinctly different colours in each of these shirts.

As for the towels and the dish towels, they definitely look like crap.

It’s a good thing that I really don’t care what my dish towels look like, as long as they work.

TIE DYE ADVICE:

  1. Buy gloves.
  2. Seriously, buy some gloves. Spare your hands.
  3. Use 100% cotton clothing if you have access to it.
  4. Don’t do this on, or near, your white counters or wood floors. Garage? Great! Deck? Great! Kitchen? Avoid if you can.

Okay, that’s it for the tie-dye experiment. I’m not sure that it’s worth all the hype that everyone has given it over the past few months. Although, I do reserve the right to change my mind. Let’s hope I don’t start dying everything I own in the next few days. You really never know what’s going to happen when I get bored.

Releasing thoughts from my brain so they don’t control the rest of my day.

Debt scares me.

When I was a kid my family did not have a lot of money. Often we barely had enough to get by. My parents always made sure that we had food to eat., but I do remember instances where I was wearing my shoes until they had holes in them, and then continuing to wear them past that point. I do remember my siblings and I having to go out on our bikes to the nearby recreation centres and ball parks to look for cans so that we could collect enough money to hopefully put five dollars worth of gas in the vehicle so my father could get to work. I do remember a few times when the collection of cans did not provide enough and my dad actually hitch-hiked to work.

Debt scares me. I don’t ever want to go back to that place.

Now that I’m an adult, I am really good at living within my means. I’m really good at not getting something unless I absolutely need it. I’m really good at going without. I know the difference between needs and wants and I know how to stretch a dollar. I’m very careful with what I purchase. I’m very careful with how I choose to live because debt scares me.

I want a plan.

I want to know that everything is going to be okay. I want safety and security in a world that can provide anything but.

Eco-friendly items for the home

Hi. Hello. Good day! My name is Vee and I hate single-use items. I hate, hate, hate them with the fire of a thousand suns.

Today I want to share some of the reusable alternatives that I’ve implemented in my home and life. I believe each of these items are affordable and have the potential to eliminate a lot of waste from daily life. I’m sharing because there’s a huge misconception that leading a sustainable or eco-friendly lifestyle is expensive. It can be, if you choose that, but it doesn’t have to be. There are plenty of really affordable alternatives out there that everyone can implement in their lives.

Disclaimer: I took these pictures at 9 pm whilst there was a giant rain-storm outside and a tornado warning. The light was going in and out and as a result, there’s a different variation of lighting in these pictures. Hopefully it’s not too distracting.

HAND-KNIT DISH CLOTHS/SCRUBBERS

There’s this saying: “You know you’re an adult when you get more excited for home items then anything else”. That’s me! That’s totally me. My mom makes these dish cloths/scrubbers with yarn that she finds at thrift stores. They rarely match, which makes them feel even more like a one-of-a-kind set, and they eliminate the need to purchase sponges, dish cloths and even paper towels (she makes various sizes for different needs around the home).

I highly recommend cloths knitted in this fashion, as they’re tough and can scrub any ‘caked-on’ mess made in the kitchen. They’re also great for cleaning, too! Just throw in your washer with towels and reuse.

These cloths can be purchased in varying sizes on Etsy. Or, if you’re really crafty, you can teach yourself how to make them! One ball of yarn can make 12 cloths, so they’re very cheap. One of the big bonuses to purchasing them from Etsy is that the platform has become a place for Grandma’s to sell their hand-made kintted goods. So, if you do buy them there’s a good chance you’re supporting a grandma through her retirement.

BEESWAX FOOD WRAPS

Beeswax wrap is an incredible alternative to plastic wrap. Made of beeswax, these items are completely biodegradable and cover your food in just the same way as plastic wrap. This alternative can be quite pricey, depending on where you buy it from. But, if you’re someone who keeps leftovers in your fridge often, they’re a great investment to make.

I’ve read studies online that say beeswax wrap keeps your food fresher longer than plastic wrap. I cannot prove this as it’s been several years since I’ve owned plastic wrap, but if it does, that’s a pretty cool bonus. And even if it doesn’t, you’re still eliminating single-use product waste.

REUSABLE FOOD-STORAGE BAGS

I hate Ziploc bags. I hate no-name single-use bags of any type. I really do. The entire premise of the product is that it carry something for you for, at times, just minutes before it gets trashed. With the average use of a Ziploc or no-name single-use bag being a half day, they are an extremely wasteful product.

I purchased the bags pictured for $12. They’re freezer, microwave and dishwasher safe and made from food-grade silicone. They’re leak-proof and an incredible alternative to to all single-use bags. Point of note – I actually stored spaghetti sauce in one of these bags last week and not only did it not leak, but it also didn’t stain.

I highly recommend a set of these if your budget allows it! They’re available online and are starting to pop up more and more at grocery stores, if you’re looking.

REUSABLE WATER BOTTLES

Let’s remember that plastic is not the enemy. The eco-friendly movement is about eliminating or minimizing single-use plastics. The point is to purchase things intentionally so that they can be used over and over and not just trashed. While reusable water bottles can get quite expensive, depending on the type you buy (I’ve seen glass bottles cost $75) they don’t have to. The blender bottle of the left of this photo cost me $7.99 and I bought it four years ago. Reusable water bottles are an easy, cheap and eco-friendly way to keep single use plastics out of your home. Bonus points for the fact that it encourages you to drink more water… which everyone can benefit from.

Caveat: If you don’t have safe drinking water at your home, I realize that this product likely won’t be of any use to you. And yes, I do understand that not everyone in this world has safe drinking water at home.

STAINLESS STEEL STRAWS

Stainless steel straws are SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO cheap. So are reusable plastic straws, bamboo straws and glass straws. I realize that COVID has put a damper on being able use your own straws in a lot of restaurants and coffee shops, but you can absolutely still use them at home.

Single use plastic straws are too small to be recycled. Because of this, all disposable straws are winding up in landfills, or worse… in the ocean. For something that is used for just a few minutes at a time, and then trashed, purchasing a set of straws (which can be done for as little as four dollars depending on the type that you get) helps save our sea creatures and means that you’re always smoothie ready.

MAKEUP REMOVER PADS

Disposable cotton rounds have sat atop bathroom vanities across the world for decades. They’re easy to get, cheap as heck and you can buy them from virtually any drug store or grocery store. Most important, they’re easy to throw away, which I hate. I’m genuinely really proud of the fact that they seem to FINALLY be going out of style.

Reusable makeup remover pads/cotton rounds are exactly that, reusable. With it estimated that the average woman can possibly go through as many as 100 disposable cotton rounds in a single month, purchasing one package of reusable makeup remover pads can eliminate more than 1,200+ pieces of waste in a single year.

This particular set that I have was actually made by my mom. She used an old towel (because upcycling is cool) and sewed around the edges to ensure they wouldn’t fray. That being said, you can purchase a single set for as little as $10 for 20 online. In store, they tend to run more expensive.

If you don’t mind the stains, white is a pretty common colour. To me, the stains just remind me that they’ve been used. That being said, they do come in a variety of colours, including dark fabrics that will hide stains if that might bother you.

DRYER BALLS

Dryer balls are an eco-friendly and natural alternative to both dryer sheets and fabric softener. Whilst there are many types of dryer balls – wool, plastic, rubber, etc.. dryer balls made from wool are completely biodegradable.

Dryer balls work by retaining the heat they soak up when the dryer is turned on. Using that heat, they keep your laundry from clumping allowing the heat emitted from the dryer to be more evenly distributed through your laundry. These actions will help to cut your drying time considerably, and in turn, lower your electric bills. Wool dryer balls also work as a softener, helping smooth out wrinkles and keeping your clothes looking smooth and feeling cozy.

I bought a set of six for $15. It’s estimated dryer balls can last up to a year, depending on how much laundry your household does. When they have worn out and just aren’t fulfilling their purpose anymore (as they do deteriorate over time), you can literally just take it and drop it in your garden or compost, if you compost at home. (Plastic/Rubber dryer balls are obviously not biodegradable, this is a perk specific to wool balls)

TO CONCLUDE

It doesn’t have to be expensive to lead a more eco-friendly and sustainable lifestyle. Looking at this post, it might look expensive seeing everything together, but please keep in mind that all of these items were purchased or given to me at different times. A one time investment in every item together would be very costly and hard on the bank account. But, if you slowly implement meaningful, intentional changes over time, you’ll come to realize just how helpful it can be to have high-quality, reusable items in your home.

It’s a cliche statement, I know, but remember that you might not be able to do all of the good that this world needs, but the world needs all of the good that you can do. And minimizing, eliminating single-use disposable items and trash is a very good thing!