Blogging 105: How do you get more comments on your blog posts?

Photo credit: lyfemarketing.com

Without knowing it, many of you have taken part in an experiment over the past couple of weeks. What? An experiment? How sneaky of me, I know! The experiment was a test to see just how many comments could be collected on one post, if I asked the right questions. And let me tell you, your responses did not disappoint!

One of the most common things I see asked with respect to blogging is how do you get more people to comment on your blog. People ask here on WordPress, they ask on Twitter, my former bosses used to ask me all the time. How do you get more people to comment on your blog, your content and your message? It’s actually a question asked in the corporate world quite a lot. Even companies like Nike and Starbucks can struggle with getting people to provide feedback.

So how do you encourage engagement? How do you get more comments? How do you cause people to stop by your blog and think ‘I need to comment on this post!’

Suggestion 1: Ask them!

It seems simple, right? But many corporations and individual bloggers forget. We get so wrapped up in sending the message that we want to send that we forget to quite simply ask people what they think, how they feel, what their opinions are.

The two posts on my blog that garnered the most comments over the past few weeks were posts in which I purposefully went out of my way to ask you for your opinions.

And your perspectives, I got! If you read the comments section of these two posts: Absolutely (un)important questions and I would like to hear your opinion you will see oodles of different opinions. Each post has more than 100 comments on it. People went out of their way to not just share line or two, but to send me meaningful, thoughtful opinions of their perspectives.

If you want people to leave comments on your blog, ASK THEM QUESTIONS. Talk with them… instead of at them. Let them know that you want to hear their opinions. Let them know that their opinions, no matter if they align or disagree with your own, are welcome on your blog and then encourage them to share. People like to share their own opinions and will feel a lot safer to do so if you let them know their opinions are welcome on your blog.

Suggestion 2: Thank people who do share.

All too often I stop by someone’s blog to leave a comment and they don’t bother to respond to my comment.

This is totally fine. You don’t have to respond to your comments. But I truly believe that if you don’t respond to the comments people leave on your blog, they aren’t likely to leave another. It’s true for me, and as you’re reading this, it’s probably true for you. If you take the time to leave someone a heartfelt comment and they don’t bother to write back, why would you do that ever again?

This is why it’s really important that, if you do get comments on your blog, you respond. Responding to your comments lets people know that, whether they agree with your not, their thoughts are welcome on your blog. Responding to your comments encourages people to come back to your blog. Responding to your comments shows the people reading your blog that you’re thankful for their reading your blog. When your readers find you, let them know you’re thankful for every comment they leave.

Also – please remember, not everyone communicates in the same way. Some people have a way with words where they can leave you a really eloquent comment whereas others might just say ‘Thank you for writing this’. Please don’t devalue ‘thank you for writing this’. A reader is still valuable to your blog, no matter how long of a comment they leave.

Suggestion 3: Encourage feedback.

While not every post on your blog is going to be you specifically going out of your way to ask people for their answers to important questions, you can ask for feedback on your own content.

When you make a blog post, encourage people to respond. If you’re sharing your opinion, ask people for theirs. If you’re sharing a short story, ask people what they think of your short story. If you’re sharing your art, ask people to rate it on a scale from 1-10. However you see fit, whatever you see most aligning with your post, encourage readers to give you feedback.

Please note – When you’re encouraging feedback, don’t end your posts with a question that can be answered with a single word. End your post with a question that asks people for their opinions.

Example: You write a post about a truly orgasmic pizza eating experience. On the end of the post you leave a question.

Bad Questions: Do you like pizza? Do you like cheese? Do you like pineapple on pizza?

Good Questions: Can you tell me about a time in your life when you just couldn’t believe the pizza you were eating? What made that pizza so incredible? What about that memory sticks out so well in your mind?

The reason why the bad questions are bad questions is because someone can say “Yes. No. Yes”. It’s so simple that it doesn’t really encourage any informative feedback, it only asks yes or no questions. Yes or no questions that can be answered so quickly people might just skip over answering them at all. On the other hand, with the good questions listed, if people read that, they’re going to want to share their stories with you. They’re going to take the time to think about the best pizza they’ve ever had and they’re going to type up the whole story in your comments button.

Suggestion 4: Leave a comment on another blog.

Simply put, people are more likely to view and leave comments on the blogs of people who’ve left comments on their blog.

Now it’s important to note that with this suggestion, I DO NOT mean to spam people. Don’t just go to someone’s blog and write “Hey Check out my blog!” in their comments. I mean that you should go to someone’s blog, leave them a thoughtful comment and then mention “Hey, I also just recently touched on this subject on my blog. Would you consider reading it?”

It’s worth noting that this happens ALL THE TIME in the corporate world. The Oreo brand is notorious for leaving comments on other brands from KitKat to Boeing to American Eagle. They do this because they know that in doing so, they’re supporting other companies, but also supporting themselves. When people see a comment from Oreo on an American Eagle release, Oreo knows that’s going to put their brand at top of mind for a lot of American Eagle customers. It’s a small piece to marketing, but if you do it properly, an effective one.


Encouraging engagement can be difficult when you’re just starting out. But, it’s worth noting that things are always difficult when you’re just starting out. The important thing is that you try. That you put your efforts towards not just building a blog but building a community. Because people want to know they’re a part of a community and they’re being talked with, not at.

Take it slow and steady, one step at a time. Even Everest is conquerable so long as you go at your own pace.

Good luck!

Blogging 104: Turn you ‘Me’ and ‘I’ into ‘You’.

Photo credit: Medium.com

Who is going to search for this?

It’s a simple question, one that I think a lot of bloggers overlook. Bloggers want to write something that resonates with others, and quite often could, but they write it in a manner that makes the content only applicable to them, and perhaps a select few with the keen understanding of their personal experiences.

If you really want your words to resonate with others, if you really want to market your blog, ask yourself who is going to search for this content?

People search WordPress and Google to ask questions, to find information that they don’t yet have and to find people, places or organizations they feel most align with them, their life and their views.

So how do you write content you’re passionate about whilst writing it to a potential audience that you’ve not yet met? Turn your ‘me’ or ‘I’ into ‘You’. Pretend that you’re writing a letter to yourself. Actually, if you want to write a letter to yourself, that’s an easy step that you could take to increase your reach and allow more people to find your words.

To explain this, I’ll use my post from yesterday as an example.

My thoughts: I don’t fit in with my family. I don’t agree with them and I struggle to get along with them.

My post: You are not defined by anything that your family says, does or feels.

I wrote a letter to myself, and in the process, changed my content from being something that resonated with me, to something that had the potential to resonate with a much larger audience. The messaging is still the same, I am still explaining exactly how I am feeling at that moment in time, but I’m explaining it in a way that can resonate with more than just I.

I do this because I know that I am not the only person in the world to struggle with getting along with family. I do this because I believe that if someone were to search the subject matter, they’re more likely to search “What if you don’t get along with your family?’ than they are to search ‘I don’t get along with my family.’

I hope this is making sense.

*Important note – I am not saying to change the subject matter of your content. I am saying that you should change the perspective which you write from. Don’t write: I had amazing blueberry pancakes for breakfast. Write: The most amazing blueberry pancakes you could ever eat! You’re still writing about what you’re passionate about, but now you’re writing it in a manner that is more likely for people to search.

There are some people in this world who can write a journal and command attention with simple words. They can write me, me, me, me, me and people will hang off every word that they say. But, for the most part, unless your last name is Kardashian, I think you’ll find a lot more success changing the perspective of your words. Turn your ‘Me’ and your ‘I’ into ‘You’. Doing so allows more people to truly resonate with what you’re sharing and understand the message your’e trying to convey.

In the process of writing a letter to yourself people will read the letter and feel as though you’re writing it to them.. That’s how you learn who feels the same was a you. That’s how you truly connect with people.

Don’t change the subject of your content, just consider changing the way that you write it.


As with all advice given out on this blog, please take everything with a grain of salt. If you like the advice, consider using it. If you don’t, then just ignore it!

Blogging is not a one size fits all activity. What works for someone may not work for someone else.

I provide this information on my blog as a means to inform and to provide a new perspective on things. I speak from experience, but I also understand that what works for some doesn’t work for all. So please do not take these words as the ‘only way’.

Quashing blogging myths

Photo: LYFE Marketing

As with all marketing/blogging advice posts on my blog, please take the following information with a grain of salt. I’ve made a lot of mistakes over the years, including believing pretty much every myth on this list. That being said, myths get propagated for a reason. So, by spreading the following info, I am hoping to quash some of those myths. If you disagree with what I’ve said, that’s totally okay, I welcome other’s opinions.


You need to be tech-savvy and have coding skills in order to start a blog. There’s a preconceived notion that for a blog to be popular, it needs to be fancy. The reality is that the most important piece of your blog is the content, not the appearance. You need not use fancy layouts and intricate coding to make the appearance look more extravagant. If you have quality content the content will speak for itself. If you know nothing about coding or design, as long as you can hit publish, you can still run your blog. So please don’t feel pressured ‘keep up with the Jones’s’ with respect to the appearance of your blog. Sometimes, simple is exactly what you need.

If you build it, they will come. There are 75,000,000 blogs on WordPress alone. If you’re thinking a large hoards of people will accidentally stumble upon your blog and love it enough to stay, the likelihood of that is probably the same as the likelihood of being struck by lightning. It may sound like I say it a lot, but the truth is, marketing is integral to growth.

You have to invest a lot of money in your blog in order to make it popular. Purchasing a domain, purchasing a layout, purchasing plug-ins, purchasing designs, etc… are not a requirement to your blog being a good blog. You are the requirement to your blog being a good blog. If you choose to purchase these things, that is your choice, but please do not feel as though you have to purchase these things… because not one of them is going to make your blog appear more visible to anyone.

Blogging is an easy way to earn a ton of cash. False. False. False. False. People who actually earn cash from their blogs have spent vast amount of time investing in growing themselves a blogging community. Nothing about organic growth is easy. It takes a lot of time and effort building relationships for growth. So if you do make it to a point where you are able to earn cash with your blog, this likely didn’t come without a lot of months/years work in the process.

You have to write every single day to keep people interested. False. False False False. I cannot stress enough how false this is. If you would like to blog every day, you can. But you are not required to. The requirement to keeping people interested is being consistent. Whether you commit to one post a day, one post a week, one post a month, whatever it is, if your community knows that, they’ll come back for your blog. You just need to be consistent in your publishing.

You shouldn’t write long posts. This is perhaps one of the silliest myths of all. There is no standard ‘optimal’ length of post. What people should be saying is ‘don’t be redundant’. If you write a post that is 20 paragraphs and you continue to repeat the exact same point paragraph after paragraph after paragraph, you might want to consider trimming down your writing. But, if you write a post and the entire post is valid, important content to showing your perspective or proving your point, then it shouldn’t matter whether the post is 5 paragraphs or 20 paragraphs. People will ALWAYS take the opportunity to read what they find interesting. Length has nothing to do with that.

Blogging should be about writing. Blogging is actually about expression. Whether you’re a writer, a comic, and artist, a musician, a comedian, a graphic designer, or anyone else who wants to share their passions through a blog, you have a place here. This notion that blogging is only for writers is very closed minded. If anyone tells you that you don’t belong, ignore them. You’re here for a reason, and I am happy you are.

A niche is ‘one subject only’. If you have more than one interest, why shouldn’t you be able to write about all of them? People treat a niche as though it can only be one thing, when that’s simply not true. Your niche can be ‘Parenting/Travel/Reading” or “Mental Health/Makeup/Home Care” or whatever you desire it to be. As long as you’re communicative about what your desires are for a niche, people can and will understand and will follow you. So please don’t let anyone pigeon-hole you into a single subject.

You have to censor yourself. This is simply the opposite of what you should be doing. If you have opinions, thoughts or feelings, so long as you’re not being hateful or spiteful, you should absolutely share all of your opinions, thoughts and feelings on your blog. After all, this is the point of your blog! Don’t be afraid to talk about politics or religion or other subjects that people deem ‘tough topics’. Just be aware of the fact that if you state your opinions online, about anything, you need to be ready, willing and open to having discussion about these subjects in a respectful manner. It’s only when someone is an asshole about their opinions that they seem to get in trouble.

People are going to love every post that you make. This is just not possible. Everyone has different likes and dislikes. While they may appreciate something you post, another like of yours that you post about might not be of any interest to them. Therefore, you will have some posts that are really popular and some posts that aren’t that noticed. This is normal! Don’t delete your posts because of this. Authenticity is key.

Think Different.

There are talented people all across WordPress and every other bogging platform that exists. Talented people who have a lot to share with the world, who struggle to get anyone to read their words or see their content. Why? Because they struggle to position and market their blog among the other 75 million blogs that exist in this world.

If you’re writing for a hobby, writing to keep a diary online instead of in a journal, this likely won’t matter to you at all. But if you’re on WordPress because you want to make friends and meet like-minded people, share your talents and show your skills then you need to market your blog. You have to.

While the odd person may stumble upon your blog, resonate with what you have to share and stick around from then on, the ‘accidentally finding you’ tactic is certainly not going to garner the audience you desire.

Someone that always understood marketing far better than most people on this planet is Steve Jobs. If you’ve ever heard the man speak, you know. He gets it. He knows how to turn a brand into a necessity, to a lifestyle and a feeling of belonging.

Your blog is your brand and if you want to garner an audience using your brand, you need to turn it into a necessity, a lifestyle and a place for people to find their belonging.

One of my favourite speeches from Steve Jobs can be seen here:

In the video, Jobs explains that the core value of Apple is the belief that people can change the world and that those who are crazy enough to believe they can change the world are the ones that do.

Using their slogan ‘Think Different’, Jobs explains that Apple’s desire was not to create a phone for you to make phone calls, Apple’s desire was to create a phone that makes your life better, easier, more organized. Apple’s desire was to create a computer that allowed your brain to think differently about how to do things, about what your computer can do for you and about how you can change the world from the stroke of a keyboard.

Steve Jobs was a brilliant man, one of the most brilliant of our time. In ‘thinking different’ he categorically used his ‘think different’ platform to catapult a run of the mill company to be a world, industry and technological leader. He did this because he knew he wasn’t marketing a computer. He knew that when he was marketing the life the computer could give you. He knew that he was marketing how much easier his phone would make your day.

How does this relate to blogging? Well, I’ll ask you this… in marketing your blog, do you market it as a blog, or, a community? Is it a place for you to write or a place for thoughts to change minds and learn new oulooks/perspctives? Is your blog a blog or is your blog a home for the lost, the found and the just won’t give up? Are you giving something to your readers, or merely just taking their time? Remember, Nike doesn’t sell shoes, Nike sells the idea of who you can become when you wear their shoes. If you’re selling your blog as a blog, you need to take Steve Jobs’ advice and think different. Thing bigger. Don’t market your blog as a blog. Market your blog as a home. As a place for people to come to remember they’re not alone in this world. Market your words as a means to help those who you’ve not yet met.

What does your blog bring to the table that no one else has? That no one else does? With millions of people hitting ‘Publish’ on their posts each and every day, what about your posts is should keep people coming around? What is your commodity? I don’t mean this in a condescending way, I mean this to get you thinking.

#MillennialLifeCrisis markets in honesty and understanding. The good, the bad, the ugly, the afraid to share with the world thoughts that you only keep to yourself honesty. You will find that here. People know that if they come to this community, they will hear my truths and they can feel safe to share their’s.

Some of my favourite blogs to read are those that market in travel. Not tourism, but travel (because there’s a very distinct difference). I love reading about those people who walk off the beaten path and really go to a country to learn and share the very core living culture within a place. Rebecca Goes Rendezvous does this really well.

Other blogs that I find myself gravitating towards are those who have no fear in telling their opinions with respect to real and important subject matter that a lot of people are often too afraid to talk about… too afraid to share opinions on, because they don’t want to start an argument. I like the people who aren’t afraid to share those thoughts, even if it might start an argument, because they know that they can turn it into a thoughtful and informative discussion. Filosofa’s Word does this really well.

These are both my own personal likes, though. And everyone likes something different, so please don’t take these two suggestions as the only subjects that matter.

If you really want to take your blog to the next level, and really want to have people pay attention to what you have to share, think different. Ask yourself where your blog should be positioned and make it happen. Position your blog and then market it.


90% of bloggers marketing:

“Hi my name is Sarah, please check out my blog!”

10% of bloggers effectively marketing their blog:

“Remember a time when you were moved to tears by a piece you read on someone else’s blog? Or were inspired to take action in a certain area of your life?

Well, that was art. The art of blogging.” (Quote from The Art of Blogging)

Which blog are you more likely to check out?

Because effective marketing is everything!

How to not be an asshole.

A list and reminder of how to be a decent human being.

  1. Understand that you can disagree with someone and still respect them.
  2. Understand that everyone on this earth is entitled to their own opinion.
  3. If you feel like insulting someone, don’t.
  4. If you want to talk down to someone, remember that you, too, live in a glass house.
  5. If you dont like someone, for whatever reason, you don’t have to he friends with them. Go be friends with someone else.
  6. Remember that just because “they” say it doesn’t mean that it’s true.
  7. If you consistently get the urge to punch someone, take up kickboxing or karate or some sort of physical activity to help get out your aggression in a positive way.
  8. Try to not judge, wherever possible.
  9. If you disagree with someone’s parenting, unless the child is in danger of severe harm/abuse, butt out(this is a very clear distinction). It’s not your child. Whether the parent has rules about screen time or junk food or lacks curfews or anything of the sort, it’s not your child.
  10. If you do not agree with the choices someone is making keep it to yourself.
  11. If you feel the urge to yell, try waiting until you’ve calmed down to have a conversation like a mature human being.
  12. If you dont like the way someone is leading their life, remind yourself that it’s their life, not yours.
  13. If you find yourself bullying someone and you realize you’re doing it, stop. You can make the choice to change.
  14. Operate based on facts, not personal opinions.
  15. If you dont have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.
  16. Road rage is not productive. There are bad drivers all over the world. If you feel like swearing or screaming or gesturing, remember they likely won’t hear you or see you. And if you get the urge to do something more drastic, pyerhaps you should worry more about your anger issues rather than their lack of driving skills.
  17. Don’t drive with your high-beams on in traffic at night. Also, don’t tailgate people on the highway.
  18. Do not push your religious beliefs on anyone.
  19. Apologize. Always apologize.

Reminder: you are enough.

Dear Self,

You really ought to be nicer to yourself more often. Take a look at yourself in the mirror and remember that you are the glue holding this together. Remind yourself of your intelligence, of your humour, of your good moments and your strengths. Because you have them all in stride.

You really ought to remember what you’ve been through in your life, not as a negative, but as a positive. You did it. You survived. You got stronger. You made it through that and you can make it through this. Nothing in this world is insurmountable so long as you believe in yourself and your capabilities.

Also, you really ought to quit with the excuses. Exercise is good for you, so stop finding reasons to not go. Eating healthy keeps your body properly functioning, so stop eating crap. Your well being is what is most important, so don’t ever deny help when it’s offered, or when you need it. We all need help sometimes. Your family loves you, so stop avoiding them and your friends want what’s best for you, so let them know you appreciate them.

Self, I wish you could know how great you are. I wish you could quit thinking poorly about yourself and direct some of those compliments you like to give to others towards yourself once in a while.

Don’t ever try to hide who you are. Don’t lower your standards, don’t dull your shine. Don’t think that you’re too much or you’re not enough because who you are is good enough. Good enough for you, good enough for friends, good enough for family. Those that love you love you just the way that you are. And the great thing about being human is that good enough can always get better, so long as you believe in yourself.

You’re talented. You’re insightful. You’ve got a way with words that you really ought to start using more often. You’re open-minded, you believe the better in people and yet somehow you don’t believe the better of yourself. You really ought to change that.

Promise me self, in the latter half of this year, I want you to be better. I want you to think smarter and stop putting yourself down. I want you to see the good in yourself and make a conscious effort to smile every day. Because you deserve to smile… even on the crappy days. Nothing in this life is perfect, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find a bright spot.

You are enough. Love yourself, please. Love everything about yourself. You’re this way for a reason so it’s time you start appreciating that and understanding that you are enough.

Today was a good day. Today I am grateful.

A dear friend of mine, Ashok, recently told me that I should end each day by saying ‘Today was a good day, today I am grateful’.

I’m trying to take his advice to heart, knowing that if I start believing the better, I’ll start seeing the better. I’ve always been someone who’s had a hard time getting past the negatives in a day. But I’m making changes. I’m trying to remind myself the good is more important, and that I need to stop and pay more attention to it when it comes.

Today was a beautiful summer day. In what’s a seemingly rare occasion around here this season, the sun was shining… all day long, the birds chirped, the world (at least my corner of it) was peaceful. Anxiety will always be a part of me, but that doesn’t mean it has to be the largest part. Today, my anxiety did not win.