Alexa, tell me I’m pretty.

One of the things I purchased with the winnings from my recent work awards was an Amazon Echo Dot. I’ve always wanted to try one, but I just never really got around to it. Now that I didn’t even have to spend my own money on it, it seemed like the perfect time. I also have a somewhat smart house already. (Can control lights, thermostat, etc… with my phone)

Oh Alexa.

She’s nosey.

She’s smart, but she’s nosey.

This is possibly because I haven’t quite figured out how to use her yet. I was watching the Corona Virus Press Conference this afternoon (to learn more about the continuous nightmare unfolding in this city) and they were taking questions from reporters. One of the reporters acknowledged herself as ‘Alexa [Insert Last Name]’ before asking her question. The Echo Dot heard the question and said ‘I’m not sure’.

Apparently I didn’t properly set up the voice activation cues.

Anyways, I’ll be getting on that tonight.

Does anyone else have one of the Amazon Alexa devices? What do you use it for? What can I use mine for that I haven’t discovered yet?

NueMedics TENS Therapy – small, mighty and worth every penny

A little more than a year ago I briefly tried my hand with Physiotherapy. I only ended up going to four sessions because it was $130 per session and I just didn’t have enough money to continue going.

One thing that I do remember about physio though, was that each time I was there, a large chunk of the time I spent in each session, I was hooked up to a machine that sent a deep, pulsating vibration to my muscles. At the time, I didn’t know what it was. But, it was (what I believed to be) a much larger version of the Dr. Ho Pain Therapy System that dominates infomercials on television.

Turns out, it was. It’s called “Tens Therapy”, or Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation. It also turns out that, while the Dr. Ho Pain Therapy System is incredulously overpriced, he’s not the only person to market the technology that is ‘Tens Therapy’.

First, to explain: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy involves the use of low-voltage electric currents to treat pain. A small device delivers the current at or near nerves. TENS therapy blocks or changes your perception of pain.

Basically, it sends a shockwave to your muscles and when you’re done, you feel like you’ve had a really painful, but very helpful, deep tissue massage.

Insert NueMedics TENS EMS Machine Pro Muscle Stimulator.

This small but mighty device came from Amazon and costs less than a half of what one physiotherapy session cost me.

It’s the size of an MP3 player and it packs all of the power and all of the punch that the machine my physiotherapist charged me $130 a session for.

It features 6 pre-programmed massage modes: tapping, acupuncture, deep tissue, foot, cupping, and combo. Within each mode there’s 20 different tolerance levels so that you can turn the power of the shock to your muscles as high or as low as you need, depending on your pain tolerance that day.

It’s so easy to use. All you have to do is peel and stick the pads to your skin, over the area which you’re experiencing deep muscle pains. Then, turn on the device. It shoots the current through the cords, to the pad and into your muscles.

There’s cords for eight total electrodes to work at once, so you can space them out according to your pain points, or put them all in one place for a very centered pain management approach. It works on its own timer system, so you just sit still for twenty minutes, then you’re done. You can reapply it to other muscles, or, roll up the cord and store it away for the next day. It is so handy.

I am someone who uses foam rollers, back massagers, tiger balm and muscle relaxants and this handy little device works better than all of those things combined.

The package comes with multiple pads of varying sizes to adhere to the different parts of your body where you feel pain.

It’s a completely rechargeable device that charges via USB. So you can connect it to your computer, or the wall, or wherever you have USB ports.

I know that mine looks a little scratched up in the photos. That is genuinely because I use this little device so darn much. It has been a complete game changer for me in dealing with muscular pain in my body. The aches I feel are just a little less achy these days. To me, that is everything.

Less pain is always a good thing.

As mentioned above, this was purchased from Amazon. On Amazon.ca you can buy it for $59.99. I’m not including a link because Amazon Canada links won’t work for the rest of the world, so if you did click it and aren’t Canadian, it wouldn’t do you any good. Also, though, you can buy it on the NueMedics website for cheaper than $59.99 depending on where in the world you are.

It’s small. It’s mighty. It’s cheaper than a massage. It’s cheaper than Physiotherapy. It’s cheaper than some foam rollers. Most importantly, it lessens the need for pain medication.

10/10 – I highly recommend this product. If its within your budget, depending on where you shop (40-60 dollars), it is well worth it to help achy sory muscles.