The importance of medical research, and, the doctors who do that research.

A few months back I wrote a post in which I explained that if I ever won the lottery, I’d donate a large sum of my winnings towards medical school tuition for prospective doctors. I also explained how my grandpa was the one who gave me the idea/outlook. (Click here to read the post)

Last night I read an article that, once again, reminded me the importance that doctors play in each of our lives. The article explains that researches at the University of British Columbia (UBC) believe they’ve found a means to reverse or eliminate Type 2 Diabetes. (The Arcticle)

The jist of the article is that researches at the UBC believe they’ve targeted a protein in sufferers of Type 2 Diabetes that they believe, if eliminated, can reverse or eliminate the the disease. This is huge news! Imagine the amount of people in this world that could benefit from this.

Research saves lives. Research considerably improves the lives of people living with medical conditions and research is vastly important to pushing the medical field, and the human race, forward. And doctors are so integral to this research.

Think of all of the diseases/conditions that exist. It puts my mind at ease to know that in a lab, somewhere in this world, there’s doctors working away trying to fix them, to reverse them or eliminate them. They’re researching ways to find cures. They’re researching ways to aid those who are suffering. Even if you’re not suffering, you know someone who is, and seeing that person you know and love be able to feel better, that’s worth a whole lot. Research helps everyone.

Just imagine a time in our lives when no one has to suffer from Type 2 Diabetes anymore. Or imagine, the doctors researching a reversal of Alzheimer’s finding success. Or any disease for that matter.

Doctors are so integral to the well being of our planet, and I hope that as more research comes out more people will start to realize that.

I wholeheartedly believe that no prospective doctor should ever be deterred from his/her dream due to the sheer cost of medical school/becoming a doctor, and I hope that one day I am able to help them as much as they help the rest of us.

#FUCKCANCER

You know that question that people ask when you’re bored, ‘if you were to win the lottery tomorrow, what would you spend your money on’? I asked that to my grandpa one day (when he was around) and he gave me an answer that has stuck with me ever since. Further to that, not only did I love and appreciate his answer, I have adopted it myself for when I get asked variations of the above question.

‘I would donate at least half,’ he said.

‘What would you donate the money towards?’ I asked.

‘Medical school tuition fees. Every single person in this world will need a doctor at one point or another, and, if you’re one of those people with the courage and determination to become a doctor, you should never be turned away for fear of paying for your education. Making more doctors benefits everyone.”

I remember being so dumbfounded and impressed when he said that to me. It made so much sense. Doctor’s benefit everyone. Whether they’re practitioners or researches, doctors push our planet forward and they help keep us healthy and safe, which is something my family has needed quite a bit of lately.

Late last year my mom was hit with a lot of exhaustion. She kept catching cold’s and it seemed like when she was getting sick, she couldn’t shake it. Ultimately, she and my dad made the decision that she was going to retire. She wanted to spend more time with my dad, and, felt as though if she wasn’t working so hard she might not be so exhausted all of the time.

She retired on November 30th.

On December 14th she went into the hospital emergency. I won’t explain why, as it’s very much TMI for this story. But, she needed to go to the hospital. Within 48 hours she had exploratory surgery.

On December 19 she was given the results of her exploratory surgery. She was diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer. It had been caught exceptionally early. The doctors were praising her for advocating so strongly for herself that something was wrong.

She was scheduled for a hysterectomy on January 8th. The surgery went well. She spent four days in the hospital following the surgery to recover and she was sent home to continue her recovery. Part of the treatment plan for my mom was that she complete five weeks of radiation therapy treatments as a precautionary treatment.

Throughout this entire process, it has been doctor’s who’ve gone above and beyond to make sure that my mom is okay. As she broke down in tears in the doctors office when she was given her diagnosis, it was her doctor who promised her a treatment plan that would allow her to recover and enjoy her retirement with her husband. When she went into surgery, it was doctors who instilled in her the warrior mentality that she was going to get through this, all she had to do was fight.

There’s been an incredible team of doctors and nurses (I can’t forget about the nurses because they’ve been incredible too) looking after my mom every step of the way and for that, I am so thankful.

Honestly, I believed in the value of doctors long before this ever happened. But now, more so than ever before, I believe that an investment in doctors and future doctors is something that benefits us all. Even if you don’t get sick, even if you think you have no use for them – you love someone in this world and they will need a doctor.

If I ever win the lottery, I am donating half of it to tuition for medical school students.

The world benefits when we have more doctors and when we have more informed doctors.

Also, #FUCKCANCER. My mom is a warrior.

A doctor, some updates and still no answers.

I had a follow up appointment with the ENT (Ear Nose and Throat) specialist today. After taking 9 months to get to him (referrals take forever in this part of the country) it’s so nice being able to book follow up appointments so quickly.

Where we last left off – I’ve had a sinus infection and several other mysterious ailments since November of 2017. The ENT Specialist made a referral for me to get a CT Scan so that he could have a full view of the inside of my head. The scan was done two weeks ago, so today, I went for the results of the CT Scan, hoping and praying that something was wrong on my scan so at least we would have something that was fixable.

My CT scan is perfectly normal. According to him, looking at my scan looks like a normal scan of a perfectly normal human being.

This obviously upset me quite a bit because I’ve been struggling for quite a while. And, he can see that I am struggling. He let me know that he sees I’m struggling and he wants to make me better. When he tried to stick his laparoscopic camera up my nose to see what was going on, he could not because it was too swollen.

Thankfully, the ENT specialist is not quitting on me. He proclaimed that he knows something is wrong with me and he will get to the bottom of it if I have to keep coming back to see him every month. Which, thank you! Thank you so much. I have finally found a doctor that agrees something is not right and needs to be fixed.

He’s scheduled me for some AutoImmune – Blood Tests for next week. (Thank you to DomesticatedRambler for suggesting that on a previous post I made to this blog) The ENT suggested that if this is something autoimmune related, the blood markers test he’s sending me for could explain a lot.

He’s also scheduled me to have a full scale allergist appointment in a couple of weeks. The test is not just a blood test (like I’ve had in the past), but instead, a full fledged allergen test where they prick you with the allergen and tape the area of your skin to see where your body/blood reacts and where it doesn’t. Apparently it tests for up to 250 allergens, so it involves getting poked by needles 250 times. Sounds like fun! Not! But, if it helps figure out what’s wrong with me, I will be grateful.

The ENT also referred me to a new medication for sinus infections called ‘Rhino Rinse’. It’s not something I’ve ever had before. He says you need to get referrals for it and then told me that it would be covered by my insurance. When I mentioned to him that I was presently unemployed, and thus without insurance, he gave me one. He just gave it to me! He said the units could be quite pricey and he does’t want me to have to pay for it if he’s not even positive if it will help me or not. How nice is he? So amazing!

I left the appointment today with him saying “I know you’re not feeling good, I know you’re struggling. I can see it. I am going to do whatever I can and whatever is in my power to help you feel better. We will get to the bottom of this, so please don’t give up.”

It’s like he knew exactly what I needed to hear but didn’t want to ask him to say. Nevertheless it made me tear up when he said it. I’m just so thankful to have found a doctor who is helpful and doesn’t pass me off as a hypochondriac.

I have a follow up with the ENT on April 11. At that time he will provide me the results to my AutoImmune blood work and to my allergy test. Here’s to praying that at least one of those shows something. Anything! If I know what’s wrong I can work to fixing it. I just need to know what’s wrong.

Whew, this was a lot to say. Heading to bed now.

Rest easy, world. ❤