Applying for jobs is a frustrating process.

I miss the days when you could walk into a place of employment and ask for an application. The wonderful soul working there would hand you a piece of paper and you could fill it out. That’s it, that’s all. And then, your ability to get an interview was measured based off what was listed on your application.

Those were the good ole days.

Yesterday I spent one hour and fourteen minutes submitting an application for ONE PLACE. ONE PLACE. They had my resume and cover letter submitted through LinkedIn. Once that was submitted I was sent an email exclaiming that I needed to “apply” and that those who applied had a 60% higher chance of getting an interview.

I thought that I had applied – silly me.

Nevertheless, I bit the bullet, clicked the link and started to ‘apply’. What followed was more than thirty minutes of every question that could, and should, actually be asked during a job interview. What would you bring to our team culture? If we have a staff game night, what game are you bringing? What is your biggest weakeness? And on, and on, and on.

This got me thinking… if you’re asking these questions to candidates during the application process, what do you actually ask during a job interview? Or do you even host an interview? Maybe you just make candidates jump through so many hoops that whoever is left standing at the end, you think ‘yeah, they put up with all that shit, we better hire them’.

Following the thirty minutes of job interview questions that I had to fill out, I thought ‘I’m done. Thank goodness’. I went on to researching more positions I’m qualified for and just a few short minutes later heard my phone beep with the email noise.

It was this company, again.

‘Please complete the pre-interview cognitive assessment test’, the email read. ‘Candidates who complete this test prove they’re intelligence and ability to work and therefore have advantages over candidates who don’t complete this assessment.’

Well, shit. I don’t want to have gotten this far into it and not completed the application now. So, I caved… clicked the link and started the test.

What I got was thirty minutes of infuriating math and pattern questions that have nothing to do with marketing, communications or public relations. My ability to determine what symbol comes next after a row of 20 symbols, that’s going to make me a better public relations specialist? My ability to remember the ‘FOIL’ technique to do timed math equations, that is going to make me a better marketer?

I don’t understand this company. I don’t. An ability to answer math questions or complete pattern recognition does not measure my culpability in an office environment. It does not tell you if I can write press releases, it does not explain whether or not I can handle stress. It tells you that I paid attention in math class when I was in school.

Job hunting is infuriating. When did it get this why? Why did it get this way? What is the point of even having a resume and cover letter anymore if all that really matters is how well you can jump through these hoops for a potential employer? What is my actual education and experience worth right now if pattern recognition is what makes me a beneficial employee to an organization?

I’m ranting. I know that. I know that I just need to suck it up and deal with it. I swear though, I swear right now that if I ever become a hiring manager or have a role that involves being a part of the hiring process in an organization EVER, I will make it simple. It will be basic. We will measure candidates for their qualifications and their education and we will be efficient. I’m not going to waste the time of job hunters. That pisses me off. I will do it better.

Okay, I better go back to my job hunting now. Crossing my fingers that it’s a little less infuriating today.

Side note – is instagram down right now? I can’t get on mine at all today. Or perhaps, maybe my account got blacklisted? I don’t know.

Okay, bye.

Day 34: You are what you eat.

Photo Credit: Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education at University of Toronto

Shy of the basics (eat 5-10 servings of fruit and vegetables per day, drink lots of water, etc…) I knew next to nothing about nutrition. Honestly, I just was someone who tended to eat what I wanted, even when I knew it wasn’t good for me.

I’ve always been a firm believer that you food should make you happy. Believing that food that was good for the body and food that was good for the soul were mutually exclusive, I avoided learning more about nutrition telling myself that I was feeding my soul instead.

The past six months I’ve learned a lot about nutrition. Despite what I previously believed, you can feed your body in a means that will allow it to run at max capacity without totally hating what you’re eating.

There’s no secret formula for this. There’s no ‘quick fix’ and there’s definitely no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution when it comes to nutrition. It’s all about you, what you need to fuel your body and what you can eat to make yourself feel good.

Sure, the basics still apply: drink lots of water, eat a ton of vegetables, protein is good. But there’s much more too it than that.

Some basic suggestions when it comes to nutrition:

**Please be advised these are entirely my own opinions. If you disagree with them that is completely okay. As mentioned above, one size fits all is not realistic when it comes to nutrition and it’s perfectly normal for people to have differing opinions. I welcome any suggestions anyone wants to share.

  • Know what your purpose is with food. Are you eating for performance? Are you eating for survival? Are you eating for weight loss? What are your goals as far as your diet?
  • No one is going to know your body better than you are so ensure you’re properly educating yourself on what you need to achieve your own goals.
  • Make informed decisions. Don’t think that because your friend is having success on their diet plan that it’s going to work for you.
  • Protein is VERY IMPORTANT. Protein is a component of every cell in the body. Your body uses protein to build and repair tissue. It’s an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin and blood. And remember that not all proteins are created equal. Do your research when it comes to what protein will best suit your body and diet plan.
  • The less processed, the better. Whole foods will always bring more value to your body than processed food. That being said, be your own chef. For example: instead of buying the pre-packaged oatmeal with sweeteners and artificial flavours already in it – buy plain oats and sweeten them yourself. If you know what goes into your food you know what you’ll get out of your food.
  • Educate yourself on what the benefits are of the food you’re eating. Kale is a superfood, but why? Learn what the benefits are of the food you’re choosing to eat.
  • Try to skip the caffeine at night. Your sleep will thank you.
  • Learn where you have a food intolerance. Pay attention to your body and how it reacts to what you’re eating. This is something that I’ve been avoiding for the better majority of my life, but when I stopped to take a look at how my body reacted to different foods, it made a world of difference to cut certain things out. There’s more than just lactose intolerance out there. People can have an intolerance to all sorts of different foods and if you don’t pay attention you may never realize it.
  • Keep a food journal! This helps in big ways if you’re really trying to make a difference in your health and what you’re eating. Listing the foods you eat on each day and how your body reacted to it will help you better plan your meals for future.

Anyways, I’m not an expert by any means. Just a girl trying to get more out of life and feel more energized day-to-day. Being more informed about my food choices has opened up a world that I didn’t quite know existed up until last year.

Food plays a massive role in who you are and how you function. I’ve been learning that in a big way the past six months. Here’s to a healthier me in 2019.